Presentation Title

The effect of urbanization on genetic diversity and diet in coyotes (Canis latrans)

Faculty Mentor

Javier Monzón

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 32

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Urbanization results in altered, novel habitat for many animals, including large mammal carnivores. The coyote (Canis latrans) originated as a predator in the open grasslands and deserts, but are currently found in various habitats in Los Angeles County, including suburban and urban landscapes. If the inhabitants of urban areas descend from a few founders, urban coyote populations should have less genetic diversity compared to nearby wild coyote populations. In this study, we assess the bottleneck effect of urbanization using microsatellite markers genotyped in both wild and urban coyote populations. Wild Malibu coyotes consistently exhibit higher levels of genetic diversity compared to their urban Malibu counterparts. In contrast, coyotes in urban Los Angeles exhibit higher genetic diversity compared to neighboring wild coyotes. These results demonstrate that among some populations there is a trend toward a loss of genetic diversity with increasing urbanization. In addition, we assess differences in diet in both urban and wild coyotes in Malibu and Los Angeles. Forty-three percent of scat samples in Los Angeles contained anthropogenic material, while no scat samples in Malibu contained any trash.

Summary of research results to be presented

Coyotes in wild areas of Malibu consistently demonstrate higher genetic diversity compared to coyotes in urban areas of Malibu. Coyotes in urban areas of Los Angeles consistently demonstrate higher genetic diversity compared to coyotes in wild areas near Los Angeles, but this may be due to sample size limitations. 0% of scats collected in Malibu contained trash, while 45% of scats collected in Los Angeles contained anthropogenic items.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

The effect of urbanization on genetic diversity and diet in coyotes (Canis latrans)

BSC-Ursa Minor 32

Urbanization results in altered, novel habitat for many animals, including large mammal carnivores. The coyote (Canis latrans) originated as a predator in the open grasslands and deserts, but are currently found in various habitats in Los Angeles County, including suburban and urban landscapes. If the inhabitants of urban areas descend from a few founders, urban coyote populations should have less genetic diversity compared to nearby wild coyote populations. In this study, we assess the bottleneck effect of urbanization using microsatellite markers genotyped in both wild and urban coyote populations. Wild Malibu coyotes consistently exhibit higher levels of genetic diversity compared to their urban Malibu counterparts. In contrast, coyotes in urban Los Angeles exhibit higher genetic diversity compared to neighboring wild coyotes. These results demonstrate that among some populations there is a trend toward a loss of genetic diversity with increasing urbanization. In addition, we assess differences in diet in both urban and wild coyotes in Malibu and Los Angeles. Forty-three percent of scat samples in Los Angeles contained anthropogenic material, while no scat samples in Malibu contained any trash.