Presentation Title

The Impact of Pesticides on the Eelgrass of the San Juan Islands, Washington State

Faculty Mentor

Rebecca Lyons

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 131

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Zostera Marina or more commonly known as eelgrass is a sea grass found in shallow bays and estuaries which provides habitat and food to many types of aquatic life. Recently, many sea grasses have been dying off worldwide. Our hypothesis is that pesticide usage is stopping germination of eelgrass seedlings. We are focusing on San Juan Archipelago in North Western Washington. We are testing for three different types of pesticides, Glyphosate, Bifenthrin, and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in the sediment, water, and soil. To do this we collected the soil, sediment, and water from different bays on San Juan Island. Pesticides were extracted and analyzed on the following instruments: Gas Chromatograph with a Mass Spectrometer for the Bifenthrin, the Ion Chromatograph for the Glyphosate, and the Liquid Chromatograph with a Quadruple Time of Flight and Mass Spectrometer attached for the 2,4-D. 2,4-D was found in the sediment around the islands at an average concentration of 0.38 mg 2,4-D per gram of sediment, but no glyphosate was detected. Currently the water is being tested for 2,4-D concentrations and inland soil is being tested around the islands to determine if there is glyphosate and Bifenthrin that could potential migrate to the ocean. If eelgrass and the other sea grasses die off much of the coastal life in the ocean will have to move or die out. Many organisms affect humans who rely on the ocean to make a living, who enjoy the food the ocean provides or need it to survive, or for those who just love the ocean.

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

The Impact of Pesticides on the Eelgrass of the San Juan Islands, Washington State

BSC-Ursa Minor 131

Zostera Marina or more commonly known as eelgrass is a sea grass found in shallow bays and estuaries which provides habitat and food to many types of aquatic life. Recently, many sea grasses have been dying off worldwide. Our hypothesis is that pesticide usage is stopping germination of eelgrass seedlings. We are focusing on San Juan Archipelago in North Western Washington. We are testing for three different types of pesticides, Glyphosate, Bifenthrin, and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) in the sediment, water, and soil. To do this we collected the soil, sediment, and water from different bays on San Juan Island. Pesticides were extracted and analyzed on the following instruments: Gas Chromatograph with a Mass Spectrometer for the Bifenthrin, the Ion Chromatograph for the Glyphosate, and the Liquid Chromatograph with a Quadruple Time of Flight and Mass Spectrometer attached for the 2,4-D. 2,4-D was found in the sediment around the islands at an average concentration of 0.38 mg 2,4-D per gram of sediment, but no glyphosate was detected. Currently the water is being tested for 2,4-D concentrations and inland soil is being tested around the islands to determine if there is glyphosate and Bifenthrin that could potential migrate to the ocean. If eelgrass and the other sea grasses die off much of the coastal life in the ocean will have to move or die out. Many organisms affect humans who rely on the ocean to make a living, who enjoy the food the ocean provides or need it to survive, or for those who just love the ocean.