Presentation Title

The Impact of Reading Source on Retention of Factual Material and Abstract Concepts

Faculty Mentor

Larry Rosen, PhD., Professor Emeritus, Department of Psychology, California State University, Dominguez Hills.

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 25

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Within the last two decades, the ubiquitous influence of technology has progressed beyond information, communication and entertainment and extended into the classroom. Technology augmented learning is widespread in college classrooms, reaching even high school and middle school classrooms. Specifically, this study examines the transition between traditional textbooks and digital textbooks and their effect on reading comprehension. Although both textbooks deliver identical source material, they differ considerably in a multitude of other factors, such as distractibility, formatting, and supplemental capabilities. With regard to traditional textbooks and digital textbooks, individuals may also differ considerably in technology usage, perceived format desirability, and executive functioning all of which will impact comprehension. Past research has yielded mixed results as to whether one format promotes reading comprehension over the other with some showing differences between source material and retention of facts versus concepts. This study investigates the factors affecting reading comprehension and retention among college students using both formats. Forty-five participants will read texts in both formats in a counterbalanced order and be tested for learning outcomes including retention of both concrete material and abstract concepts. Furthermore, daily technology use, platform preference and executive function problems will be assessed as potential moderator variables. The results of this study will advance our understanding of how different formats influence memory, retention, and comprehension of both facts and abstract concepts. Through comparisons between participants’ performance, we can better assess which format promotes improved comprehension with potential to help students better comprehend and retain information.

Keywords: reading comprehension, digital textbooks, printed textbooks, executive functioning, technology usage

Summary of research results to be presented

Preliminary data will most likely be available by the start of the conference.

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

The Impact of Reading Source on Retention of Factual Material and Abstract Concepts

BSC-Ursa Minor 25

Within the last two decades, the ubiquitous influence of technology has progressed beyond information, communication and entertainment and extended into the classroom. Technology augmented learning is widespread in college classrooms, reaching even high school and middle school classrooms. Specifically, this study examines the transition between traditional textbooks and digital textbooks and their effect on reading comprehension. Although both textbooks deliver identical source material, they differ considerably in a multitude of other factors, such as distractibility, formatting, and supplemental capabilities. With regard to traditional textbooks and digital textbooks, individuals may also differ considerably in technology usage, perceived format desirability, and executive functioning all of which will impact comprehension. Past research has yielded mixed results as to whether one format promotes reading comprehension over the other with some showing differences between source material and retention of facts versus concepts. This study investigates the factors affecting reading comprehension and retention among college students using both formats. Forty-five participants will read texts in both formats in a counterbalanced order and be tested for learning outcomes including retention of both concrete material and abstract concepts. Furthermore, daily technology use, platform preference and executive function problems will be assessed as potential moderator variables. The results of this study will advance our understanding of how different formats influence memory, retention, and comprehension of both facts and abstract concepts. Through comparisons between participants’ performance, we can better assess which format promotes improved comprehension with potential to help students better comprehend and retain information.

Keywords: reading comprehension, digital textbooks, printed textbooks, executive functioning, technology usage