Presentation Title

Analysis of Feeding Behavior in Xenopus laevis Tadpoles

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Caryl Foristall

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 47

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Taste and nutritional needs are the main factors that drive food choice. Experiments done with fruit flies and mice have shown a preference for higher caloric foods (metabolizable foods) after periods of food deprivation, providing evidence for a taste independent pathway of food choice. Research in our lab examining this phenomenon in Xenopus laevis tadpoles yielded inconsistent results, perhaps due to a tadpole bias for certain regions of the testing tank unrelated to food choice. In order to further examine a potential taste independent pathway of food choice in X. laevis tadpoles, we created a four corner assay designed to take into account these potential biases. Results of 24 hr food deprived tadpoles did not show a preference for a higher caloric food source (metabolizable) but either showed preference for a lower caloric food (non-metabolizable) or an equal preference for both. We conclude there is no evidence for an independent pathway of food choice in X. laevis tadpoles.

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Analysis of Feeding Behavior in Xenopus laevis Tadpoles

BSC-Ursa Minor 47

Taste and nutritional needs are the main factors that drive food choice. Experiments done with fruit flies and mice have shown a preference for higher caloric foods (metabolizable foods) after periods of food deprivation, providing evidence for a taste independent pathway of food choice. Research in our lab examining this phenomenon in Xenopus laevis tadpoles yielded inconsistent results, perhaps due to a tadpole bias for certain regions of the testing tank unrelated to food choice. In order to further examine a potential taste independent pathway of food choice in X. laevis tadpoles, we created a four corner assay designed to take into account these potential biases. Results of 24 hr food deprived tadpoles did not show a preference for a higher caloric food source (metabolizable) but either showed preference for a lower caloric food (non-metabolizable) or an equal preference for both. We conclude there is no evidence for an independent pathway of food choice in X. laevis tadpoles.