Presentation Title

Tip of the Tongue Phenomenon in Bilinguals: Is there an effect of bilingual language control?

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Eleonora Rossi

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 5

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Tip of the Tongue Phenomenon in Bilinguals:

Is there an effect of bilingual language control?

The Tip of the Tongue Phenomenon – TOT – is considered to be a type of speech error in which speakers feel they know a word but fail to retrieve it. Previous research has demonstrated that bilinguals show a higher number of TOTs than monolinguals (Gollan & Acenas, 2004). One explanation that has been proposed suggests that the higher number of TOTs in bilingual speech reflects the relative lower use of each of the two languages (i.e., Weaker Links Hypothesis, Gollan & Acenas, 2004). At the same time, the Inhibitory Control Hypothesis -IC- (Green, 1998) posits that bilinguals might need to control their languages by temporarily inhibiting the dominant language (L1) to allow fluent speech production in the weaker language (L2) when they are required to switch between languages.

The goal of this study is explore the TOT phenomenon in the context of a blocked naming switching paradigm in bilinguals. This will provide an opportunity to understand how theories of TOTs can be informed by more general theories of cognitive control in bilingual speech production (IC).

We tested 26 Spanish-English bilinguals during a TOT blocked language switching paradigm. TOTs were elicited in three separate blocks – first, in L1 Spanish, then in the L2 English, and finally, again in the L1, Spanish (L1-L2-L1). Following the IC hypothesis, we hypothesize that after speaking in the L2, participants will show higher rates of TOTs in their L1, as a consequence of temporarily suppress it.

Our results support this prediction, showing higher frequencies of TOTs after performing an intervening TOT block in the L2. We discuss these results in the context of recent psycholinguistic literature on bilingual language processing and bilingual language control.

References:

Gollan, T. H., & Acenas, L. A. R. (2004). http://doi.org/10.1037/0278-7393.30.1.246

Green, D. (1998). http://doi.org/10.1017/S136672899800013

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Tip of the Tongue Phenomenon in Bilinguals: Is there an effect of bilingual language control?

BSC-Ursa Minor 5

Tip of the Tongue Phenomenon in Bilinguals:

Is there an effect of bilingual language control?

The Tip of the Tongue Phenomenon – TOT – is considered to be a type of speech error in which speakers feel they know a word but fail to retrieve it. Previous research has demonstrated that bilinguals show a higher number of TOTs than monolinguals (Gollan & Acenas, 2004). One explanation that has been proposed suggests that the higher number of TOTs in bilingual speech reflects the relative lower use of each of the two languages (i.e., Weaker Links Hypothesis, Gollan & Acenas, 2004). At the same time, the Inhibitory Control Hypothesis -IC- (Green, 1998) posits that bilinguals might need to control their languages by temporarily inhibiting the dominant language (L1) to allow fluent speech production in the weaker language (L2) when they are required to switch between languages.

The goal of this study is explore the TOT phenomenon in the context of a blocked naming switching paradigm in bilinguals. This will provide an opportunity to understand how theories of TOTs can be informed by more general theories of cognitive control in bilingual speech production (IC).

We tested 26 Spanish-English bilinguals during a TOT blocked language switching paradigm. TOTs were elicited in three separate blocks – first, in L1 Spanish, then in the L2 English, and finally, again in the L1, Spanish (L1-L2-L1). Following the IC hypothesis, we hypothesize that after speaking in the L2, participants will show higher rates of TOTs in their L1, as a consequence of temporarily suppress it.

Our results support this prediction, showing higher frequencies of TOTs after performing an intervening TOT block in the L2. We discuss these results in the context of recent psycholinguistic literature on bilingual language processing and bilingual language control.

References:

Gollan, T. H., & Acenas, L. A. R. (2004). http://doi.org/10.1037/0278-7393.30.1.246

Green, D. (1998). http://doi.org/10.1017/S136672899800013