Presentation Title

Venus and Mars's Trajectory Around the Sun

Faculty Mentor

Brock Russel, Malory Henry, Kaitlin Fundell

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 121

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

This experiment is meant to calculate the effects of the gravitational pull affecting Venus and Mars and to observe their orbit around the sun, by finding the positions of Venus and Mars over a period of time. From what has been known for decades, the rotational path of planets is similar to the shape of an ellipse.With the information we gather from our research, we will be able to understand the effects of the sun's gravitational pull on Venus and Mars. We went to the roof on top of the Science Learning Center at Whittier College. Both Venus and Mars were observed through a telescope over the course of once a week for a month. Each time we intended to find Venus and Mars, we set the telescope to the general direction of the planet. From that position, we manually found the exact placement of the planet by using the controls on the telescope to shift to exactly where the planet was visible. Once the telescope was positioned as accurately as possible we recorded its exact coordinates. When observing we used a mobile device to take a photograph of the coordinates of Venus and Mars, such as 00:40.6+ 11 degrees 37’ on March 2 for Venus and 02:43.5 +16 degrees 12’ on March 28 for Mars. When locating this data, we discovered that the planets, as well as everything else in the solar system, are constantly moving. For example, when we would finally be able to locate Venus and be able to see it clearly through the telescope, Venus would move out of frame after a period of time. When analyzing the data we concluded that the position of each planet was moving at different speeds. We currently are in the process of finding these values. We have come to the conclusion that each planet experiences different levels of gravitational pull. For example, Venus--- being closer to the sun --- experiences a stronger effect than Mars which is farther away from the Sun than Venus. By the end of this experiment, we hope to be able to analyze and further understand why Venus and Mars orbit around the sun as opposed to just floating off into space.

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Venus and Mars's Trajectory Around the Sun

BSC-Ursa Minor 121

This experiment is meant to calculate the effects of the gravitational pull affecting Venus and Mars and to observe their orbit around the sun, by finding the positions of Venus and Mars over a period of time. From what has been known for decades, the rotational path of planets is similar to the shape of an ellipse.With the information we gather from our research, we will be able to understand the effects of the sun's gravitational pull on Venus and Mars. We went to the roof on top of the Science Learning Center at Whittier College. Both Venus and Mars were observed through a telescope over the course of once a week for a month. Each time we intended to find Venus and Mars, we set the telescope to the general direction of the planet. From that position, we manually found the exact placement of the planet by using the controls on the telescope to shift to exactly where the planet was visible. Once the telescope was positioned as accurately as possible we recorded its exact coordinates. When observing we used a mobile device to take a photograph of the coordinates of Venus and Mars, such as 00:40.6+ 11 degrees 37’ on March 2 for Venus and 02:43.5 +16 degrees 12’ on March 28 for Mars. When locating this data, we discovered that the planets, as well as everything else in the solar system, are constantly moving. For example, when we would finally be able to locate Venus and be able to see it clearly through the telescope, Venus would move out of frame after a period of time. When analyzing the data we concluded that the position of each planet was moving at different speeds. We currently are in the process of finding these values. We have come to the conclusion that each planet experiences different levels of gravitational pull. For example, Venus--- being closer to the sun --- experiences a stronger effect than Mars which is farther away from the Sun than Venus. By the end of this experiment, we hope to be able to analyze and further understand why Venus and Mars orbit around the sun as opposed to just floating off into space.