Presentation Title

Assessing the Efficacy of Laser Photomodulation in Laboratory Mice Wound Healing

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Cord Brundage

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 61

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Low Level Laser Treatment (LLLT) is commercially used as a therapeutic in human and veterinary medicine to minimize inflammation and expedite wound healing. Experimentally, studies that sought to quantify the clinical significance of LLLT have had varying results. In vitro experiments involving LLLT lack the active immune response, making extrapolation difficult. Grading inflammation is often a subjective process and the application of a standardized system requires validation in a controlled setting to confirm its reliability. Consequently we are testing the effect of LLLT on the surgical wound healing of live adult mice (Mus musculus) in a controlled laboratory environment. A class II, maximum 100 megaWatt, 650 nanometer wavelength type BF laser is being used. Three experimental groups have been established, and all mice from all groups receive an initial surgical wound of approximately 2 centimeters located on their lower stomach, mimicking a spay/neuter wound. All are provided isoflourine (an anesthetic drug) during the surgical procedure. After this surgery, all mice will have their wounds surgically closed (stitches) and receive a dose of meloxicam to help ease any post-surgical pain. Group A will receive an initial laser treatment after the surgical suture is given; however this is the only laser treatment this group will get. Group B will receive laser treatments every 72 hours after that initial laser treatment. Lastly, Group C, our control group, will not receive any laser treatment after the surgical suture is provided. This control group will receive the same handling as the other groups to mimic the laser treatment procedure, but the laser will not be activated. All mice will be closely monitored and observed for the duration of this experiment (roughly two weeks). A blinded veterinarian will score each wound on inflammation and the degree of wound closure. An infrared camera will also be used to quantify heat produced from each wound area. We anticipate the results of this study serving to substantiate future clinical studies after our post recent results are presented and discussed.

Summary of research results to be presented

The results of this experiment have yet to be collected. The experiment will be starting in late October although the protocol has already been approved. This is because we are still waiting on the mice to become available for our experiment.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Assessing the Efficacy of Laser Photomodulation in Laboratory Mice Wound Healing

BSC-Ursa Minor 61

Low Level Laser Treatment (LLLT) is commercially used as a therapeutic in human and veterinary medicine to minimize inflammation and expedite wound healing. Experimentally, studies that sought to quantify the clinical significance of LLLT have had varying results. In vitro experiments involving LLLT lack the active immune response, making extrapolation difficult. Grading inflammation is often a subjective process and the application of a standardized system requires validation in a controlled setting to confirm its reliability. Consequently we are testing the effect of LLLT on the surgical wound healing of live adult mice (Mus musculus) in a controlled laboratory environment. A class II, maximum 100 megaWatt, 650 nanometer wavelength type BF laser is being used. Three experimental groups have been established, and all mice from all groups receive an initial surgical wound of approximately 2 centimeters located on their lower stomach, mimicking a spay/neuter wound. All are provided isoflourine (an anesthetic drug) during the surgical procedure. After this surgery, all mice will have their wounds surgically closed (stitches) and receive a dose of meloxicam to help ease any post-surgical pain. Group A will receive an initial laser treatment after the surgical suture is given; however this is the only laser treatment this group will get. Group B will receive laser treatments every 72 hours after that initial laser treatment. Lastly, Group C, our control group, will not receive any laser treatment after the surgical suture is provided. This control group will receive the same handling as the other groups to mimic the laser treatment procedure, but the laser will not be activated. All mice will be closely monitored and observed for the duration of this experiment (roughly two weeks). A blinded veterinarian will score each wound on inflammation and the degree of wound closure. An infrared camera will also be used to quantify heat produced from each wound area. We anticipate the results of this study serving to substantiate future clinical studies after our post recent results are presented and discussed.