Presentation Title

“Does it Matter If I Go Along with the Crowd?” Witnessing Bullying, Peer Pressure Susceptibility, and School Climate Among Latino Youth

Faculty Mentor

Guadalupe Espinoza

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 3

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Most school bullying incidents are witnessed by peers (Hutchinson, 2012). Moreover, adolescents who witness bullying report more psychological and school problems (Nishina & Juvonen, 2005). However, few studies have examined how peer dynamics may influence the extent to which witnessing bullying impacts students. The current study examines the impact of peer pressure susceptibility on the relationship between witnessing school bullying and school climate perceptions (school belonging, school safety). Participants included 434 seventh and eighth grade Latino students (64% female) who completed in-class surveys. For example, students answered four questions about witnessing bullying (e.g., “Have you seen someone get called insulting names in person, in school?”). Four questions from the Peer Group Acceptance subscale (Bowen & Richman, 2001) assessed susceptibility to peer pressure (e.g., “I tend to go along with the crowd”).

Data indicated that 82% of Latino adolescents witnessed at least one school bullying incident within the last year. Hierarchical regression models assessed whether adolescent’s susceptibility to peer pressure moderated the associations between witnessing bullying and school climate perceptions. Among adolescents with high susceptibility to peer pressure, there was no link between witnessed school bullying and school belonging or safety. However, among Latino adolescents who reported low levels of peer pressure susceptibility, results showed that witnessing bullying was related to a lower sense of school belonging and safety. The current findings reveal that it is the adolescents who are less likely to give into peer pressure, who are negatively impacted by witnessing bullying; implications for interventions will be discussed.

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

“Does it Matter If I Go Along with the Crowd?” Witnessing Bullying, Peer Pressure Susceptibility, and School Climate Among Latino Youth

BSC-Ursa Minor 3

Most school bullying incidents are witnessed by peers (Hutchinson, 2012). Moreover, adolescents who witness bullying report more psychological and school problems (Nishina & Juvonen, 2005). However, few studies have examined how peer dynamics may influence the extent to which witnessing bullying impacts students. The current study examines the impact of peer pressure susceptibility on the relationship between witnessing school bullying and school climate perceptions (school belonging, school safety). Participants included 434 seventh and eighth grade Latino students (64% female) who completed in-class surveys. For example, students answered four questions about witnessing bullying (e.g., “Have you seen someone get called insulting names in person, in school?”). Four questions from the Peer Group Acceptance subscale (Bowen & Richman, 2001) assessed susceptibility to peer pressure (e.g., “I tend to go along with the crowd”).

Data indicated that 82% of Latino adolescents witnessed at least one school bullying incident within the last year. Hierarchical regression models assessed whether adolescent’s susceptibility to peer pressure moderated the associations between witnessing bullying and school climate perceptions. Among adolescents with high susceptibility to peer pressure, there was no link between witnessed school bullying and school belonging or safety. However, among Latino adolescents who reported low levels of peer pressure susceptibility, results showed that witnessing bullying was related to a lower sense of school belonging and safety. The current findings reveal that it is the adolescents who are less likely to give into peer pressure, who are negatively impacted by witnessing bullying; implications for interventions will be discussed.