Presentation Title

Attitudes about Climate Change: the influence of personality?

Faculty Mentor

T. L. Brink

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 14

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Anthropogenic climate change poses political, economic, technological, and health challenges. Previous polling data have correlated attitudes about climate change (e.g., global warming) with variables such as political orientation and religiosity. The purpose of this study was to explore those correlations as well as the relationship with three personality traits (agreeableness, openness, and conscientiousness). Specifically, it was hypothesized that those who were more aware of and concerned about global warming would have higher levels of agreeableness, openness, and conscientiousness. Community college students (n = 56) filled out a questionnaire covering background variables, political orientation, religiosity, and the three aforementioned personality traits, as well as Gallup Poll items measuring knowledge of, and concern about, global warming. The responses of this sample were compared to national norms by means of a one sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for the maximum absolute difference between cumulative frequencies. The hypotheses were tested with Spearman Rho rank order correlation coefficients. This sample turned out to be somewhat less religious than the U.S. population, and reported being less knowledgeable about, and less concerned with, the prospect of global warming (p < .01). Attitudes and knowledge about global warming did correlate with (left) political orientation (rho = +.30, p = .026) but not with demographic background factors, personality traits, or religiosity. However, those subjects who were the most concerned about global warming also reported the greatest knowledge about global warming (rho = +.56, p < .001). The poster will include quick response codes so that viewers will be able to download the questionnaire, the data, and the completed paper. Future research on this topic should use other populations and qualitative methods (e.g., focus groups) to explore the dynamics of attitudes about climate change.

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Attitudes about Climate Change: the influence of personality?

BSC-Ursa Minor 14

Anthropogenic climate change poses political, economic, technological, and health challenges. Previous polling data have correlated attitudes about climate change (e.g., global warming) with variables such as political orientation and religiosity. The purpose of this study was to explore those correlations as well as the relationship with three personality traits (agreeableness, openness, and conscientiousness). Specifically, it was hypothesized that those who were more aware of and concerned about global warming would have higher levels of agreeableness, openness, and conscientiousness. Community college students (n = 56) filled out a questionnaire covering background variables, political orientation, religiosity, and the three aforementioned personality traits, as well as Gallup Poll items measuring knowledge of, and concern about, global warming. The responses of this sample were compared to national norms by means of a one sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for the maximum absolute difference between cumulative frequencies. The hypotheses were tested with Spearman Rho rank order correlation coefficients. This sample turned out to be somewhat less religious than the U.S. population, and reported being less knowledgeable about, and less concerned with, the prospect of global warming (p < .01). Attitudes and knowledge about global warming did correlate with (left) political orientation (rho = +.30, p = .026) but not with demographic background factors, personality traits, or religiosity. However, those subjects who were the most concerned about global warming also reported the greatest knowledge about global warming (rho = +.56, p < .001). The poster will include quick response codes so that viewers will be able to download the questionnaire, the data, and the completed paper. Future research on this topic should use other populations and qualitative methods (e.g., focus groups) to explore the dynamics of attitudes about climate change.