Presentation Title

Biculturalism and Mental Health: The Mediating Role of Bicultural Efficacy for Acculturative Family Distancing on Psychological Well-Being

Faculty Mentor

Sharon Goto

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 6

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Bicultural research has shown that ethnic minorities experience acculturative stress and heightened psychological distress. In his acculturative family distancing (AFD) theory, Hwang (2006) posited that acculturation gaps among parents and youth may lead to psychological and emotional distancing. This study examined whether self-efficacy, locus of control, and bicultural efficacy served as a mediator for the relationship between AFD and life satisfaction & self-esteem. 102 Asian American and 74 European American college students from a predominantly white institution in the US completed an online survey. Results indicated that both bicultural competence and bicultural efficacy served as mediators for the relationship between AFD and life satisfaction & self-esteem for Asian Americans, while general self-efficacy mediated the relationship between AFD and life satisfaction & self-esteem for European Americans. Implications for theorizing cross-cultural differences in constructs are discussed.

Summary of research results to be presented

Theoretically, it makes sense that self-efficacy would mediate the relationship between family distancing and psychological distress for the merged sample and for European Americans because self-efficacy has been shown to be protective of psychological distress (Au, 2015; Goldzweig et al., 2016; Zhang & Jin, 2016).

Our findings suggest that not only is bicultural efficacy protective for biculturals against AFD, but also that lowered general self-efficacy could explain the relationship between minority stress and psychological distress.

What is interesting is that only bicultural efficacy and bicultural competence, not self-efficacy, served as mediators for the bicultural sample, suggesting that bicultural efficacy overshadows self-efficacy in explaining the relationship between AFD and psychological well-being in Asian Americans.

Overall, our findings suggest that mental health pathways and well-established constructs differ between biculturals and monoculturals.

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Biculturalism and Mental Health: The Mediating Role of Bicultural Efficacy for Acculturative Family Distancing on Psychological Well-Being

BSC-Ursa Minor 6

Bicultural research has shown that ethnic minorities experience acculturative stress and heightened psychological distress. In his acculturative family distancing (AFD) theory, Hwang (2006) posited that acculturation gaps among parents and youth may lead to psychological and emotional distancing. This study examined whether self-efficacy, locus of control, and bicultural efficacy served as a mediator for the relationship between AFD and life satisfaction & self-esteem. 102 Asian American and 74 European American college students from a predominantly white institution in the US completed an online survey. Results indicated that both bicultural competence and bicultural efficacy served as mediators for the relationship between AFD and life satisfaction & self-esteem for Asian Americans, while general self-efficacy mediated the relationship between AFD and life satisfaction & self-esteem for European Americans. Implications for theorizing cross-cultural differences in constructs are discussed.