Presentation Title

Caffeine Intake and Mental Health in College Students

Faculty Mentor

George Pujalte

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 1

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Caffeine is widely used as a common source of energy because it is so readily available. Coffee, pills, soda, and energy drinks are some of the most popular forms. An increase in attention, alertness, mood elevation, cognitive function, fewer cognitive failures, lower risk of suicide, and less depressive symptoms are all benefits that have been attributed to moderate caffeine intake. Caffeine has therefore become very popular among college students. The college lifestyle, however, does not concentrate on moderate caffeine intake. Instead, very high doses of caffeine have been used by students at an average of over 800mg/day (approximately two times the recommended safe intake). Both long and short term effects of caffeine on the human body have been studied in depth. This study examined whether there is a correlation between caffeine intake and possible anxiety and depression in college students who have not been diagnosed with either mental illness. Different sources of caffeine, as well as the amount consumed per day/week, and severity of depressive and anxiety symptoms were studied. The severity of these symptoms was based on Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) scores. An online survey using Qualtrics.com was distributed to students at the Florida State University via email, Twitter™, and Facebook™.

Summary of research results to be presented

The results yielded that, compared to those who never consumed caffeine, students who consumed 1-7 cups per day experienced less negative feelings such as worry and loneliness. This could be caused by caffeine’s effects of increasing arousal and vigilance. Participants with a higher caffeine intake expressed more nervousness and poorer appetite. At higher doses, caffeine can stimulate anxious feelings and exacerbate anxiety disorders.

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Caffeine Intake and Mental Health in College Students

BSC-Ursa Minor 1

Caffeine is widely used as a common source of energy because it is so readily available. Coffee, pills, soda, and energy drinks are some of the most popular forms. An increase in attention, alertness, mood elevation, cognitive function, fewer cognitive failures, lower risk of suicide, and less depressive symptoms are all benefits that have been attributed to moderate caffeine intake. Caffeine has therefore become very popular among college students. The college lifestyle, however, does not concentrate on moderate caffeine intake. Instead, very high doses of caffeine have been used by students at an average of over 800mg/day (approximately two times the recommended safe intake). Both long and short term effects of caffeine on the human body have been studied in depth. This study examined whether there is a correlation between caffeine intake and possible anxiety and depression in college students who have not been diagnosed with either mental illness. Different sources of caffeine, as well as the amount consumed per day/week, and severity of depressive and anxiety symptoms were studied. The severity of these symptoms was based on Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) scores. An online survey using Qualtrics.com was distributed to students at the Florida State University via email, Twitter™, and Facebook™.