Presentation Title

Communication Skills in Relationships among Gender Stereotypes, Beliefs Supporting Aggression, and Sexual Harassment: Mediation Analysis

Faculty Mentor

HyeSun Lee

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 21

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Stereotypes about gender roles are related to a wide variety of negative attitudes, and are often associated with violence and harassment (Anderson & Anderson, 2008). Literature found 1) significant relationships between gender stereotypes and aggressive beliefs and between gender stereotypes in men and rape (e.g., Masser, Viki & Power, 2006) and 2) communication skills as a mediator for aggressive behavior (e.g., Babcock et al., 2011). The current study expands on previous research by examining relationships among gender stereotypes (GS), beliefs supporting aggression (BSA), the perpetration of sexual harassment (PSH), and communication skills (CS) based on the data from the Start Strong Evaluation Student Survey (Miller & Shari, 2008-2012). The findings revealed significant positive relationships between GS and both BSA and PSH; however, significant negative relationships were found between CS and both GS and BSA. Using gender as a moderator, the results showed a significant positive relationship between GS and PSH only for males and a significant negative relationship between CS with PSH only for females. A mediation analysis with the use of CS detected significant direct and indirect effects for the relationships between GS and both BSA and PSH. Informed by secondary data analysis results, the ongoing research explores types of communication skills which can effectively reduce GS and PSH for the examination of the mediational process of CS in the relationship between GS and PSH. In addition to research findings, the presentation of current research will also provide information about how secondary data analyses can facilitate undergraduate research.

Summary of research results to be presented

The findings revealed significant positive relationships between GS and both BSA and PSH; however, significant negative relationships were found between CS and both GS and BSA. Using gender as a moderator, the results showed a significant positive relationship between GS and PSH only for males and a significant negative relationship between CS with PSH only for females. A mediation analysis with the use of CS detected significant direct and indirect effects for the relationships between GS and both BSA and PSH. Informed by secondary data analysis results, the ongoing research explores types of communication skills which can effectively reduce GS and PSH for the examination of the mediational process of CS in the relationship between GS and PSH. In addition to research findings, the presentation of current research will also provide information about how secondary data analyses can facilitate undergraduate research.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Communication Skills in Relationships among Gender Stereotypes, Beliefs Supporting Aggression, and Sexual Harassment: Mediation Analysis

BSC-Ursa Minor 21

Stereotypes about gender roles are related to a wide variety of negative attitudes, and are often associated with violence and harassment (Anderson & Anderson, 2008). Literature found 1) significant relationships between gender stereotypes and aggressive beliefs and between gender stereotypes in men and rape (e.g., Masser, Viki & Power, 2006) and 2) communication skills as a mediator for aggressive behavior (e.g., Babcock et al., 2011). The current study expands on previous research by examining relationships among gender stereotypes (GS), beliefs supporting aggression (BSA), the perpetration of sexual harassment (PSH), and communication skills (CS) based on the data from the Start Strong Evaluation Student Survey (Miller & Shari, 2008-2012). The findings revealed significant positive relationships between GS and both BSA and PSH; however, significant negative relationships were found between CS and both GS and BSA. Using gender as a moderator, the results showed a significant positive relationship between GS and PSH only for males and a significant negative relationship between CS with PSH only for females. A mediation analysis with the use of CS detected significant direct and indirect effects for the relationships between GS and both BSA and PSH. Informed by secondary data analysis results, the ongoing research explores types of communication skills which can effectively reduce GS and PSH for the examination of the mediational process of CS in the relationship between GS and PSH. In addition to research findings, the presentation of current research will also provide information about how secondary data analyses can facilitate undergraduate research.