Presentation Title

Comparing Two Worlds: The Impact of Trust on Preventative Medicine in Marginalized Populations in the US Appalachia and Peruvian Andes

Faculty Mentor

Lia Roberts, Luiza Nogaj, Sylvine Deprele, Stephen Inrig

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 20

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Studies show that medical mistrust, or fear among patients and minority groups that medical professionals are not working with their best interests, can deter patients from receiving appropriate health care and increase the likelihood of negative health outcomes. What is less clear is the effect of mistrust on the use of preventive services. Some studies with minority communities show that medical mistrust increases the likelihood that at-risk minorities will avoid preventive services associated with cancer and other services. Many studies have shown that factors such as socioeconomics, demographics, immigrant status, and geographic location increase mistrust and affect a population’s healthcare access, decisions, and opinions. This study explores the role of medical mistrust on the utilization of cancer preventive services among marginalized communities in two different institutional systems (US Appalachian and Peruvian Andes). Comparative political analysis is used to explore the impact of trust in decision making and healthcare access. Drawing on 45 interviews collected in the Cusco province of Peru in the summer of 2017 and secondary analysis of survey studies of Appalachian respondents this paper demonstrates that those expressing distrust towards their respective healthcare systems are less likely to take preventative health measures. This effect of distrust applies not only to the respondent’s feeling toward health professionals but also to fear of specific medication and suspicions towards pharmaceutical companies. This study increases the scope of understanding about sources of medical mistrust and the impact it has on preventive care as well as healthcare decision-making and access to healthcare.

Keywords: Healthcare Policy, Trust, Preventative Healthcare, Cancer, Comparative Politics, Latin America

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Comparing Two Worlds: The Impact of Trust on Preventative Medicine in Marginalized Populations in the US Appalachia and Peruvian Andes

BSC-Ursa Minor 20

Studies show that medical mistrust, or fear among patients and minority groups that medical professionals are not working with their best interests, can deter patients from receiving appropriate health care and increase the likelihood of negative health outcomes. What is less clear is the effect of mistrust on the use of preventive services. Some studies with minority communities show that medical mistrust increases the likelihood that at-risk minorities will avoid preventive services associated with cancer and other services. Many studies have shown that factors such as socioeconomics, demographics, immigrant status, and geographic location increase mistrust and affect a population’s healthcare access, decisions, and opinions. This study explores the role of medical mistrust on the utilization of cancer preventive services among marginalized communities in two different institutional systems (US Appalachian and Peruvian Andes). Comparative political analysis is used to explore the impact of trust in decision making and healthcare access. Drawing on 45 interviews collected in the Cusco province of Peru in the summer of 2017 and secondary analysis of survey studies of Appalachian respondents this paper demonstrates that those expressing distrust towards their respective healthcare systems are less likely to take preventative health measures. This effect of distrust applies not only to the respondent’s feeling toward health professionals but also to fear of specific medication and suspicions towards pharmaceutical companies. This study increases the scope of understanding about sources of medical mistrust and the impact it has on preventive care as well as healthcare decision-making and access to healthcare.

Keywords: Healthcare Policy, Trust, Preventative Healthcare, Cancer, Comparative Politics, Latin America