Presentation Title

Dyslexia: Related Behaviors and Neuronal Abnormalities

Faculty Mentor

Kirsten Linch, Max Orozco, Kristi Clark

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 8

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Dyslexia is a learning disability known for inhibiting a child’s ability to read and write, despite showing normal intelligence, but there may be more to this deficit than what it seems. Countless studies have found that children with reading disabilities (RD) display a variety of behavioral problems compared to their non-dyslexic counterparts. Even with this knowledge it remains unclear as to why these complications occur. This study focuses on identifying problems in attention, adaptability, and social skills in a sample of reading disabled children. Additionally, the study aims to identify the source for these issues by examining the Lateral Prefrontal Cortex, the Dorsal Anterior Cingulate Cortex, and Parietal Lobe. Neuronal data was obtained from 60 children who were scanned using structural magnetic resonance imaging, whereas their parents provided behavioral data through the BRIEF, CBCL, and Vineland-II. Parents of dyslexic children reported more problems in attention, compared to parents of non-dyslexic children. Results were not significant for social and adaptive behavior. Neuronal comparisons also yielded no significant differences. It is clear that dyslexic children display a higher amount of problems with attention, but it is unclear as to why this is so. It’s possible that structural measurements are unrelated to the problems that manifest in dyslexia. Instead, these issues may come from the pathways that form during development. Future studies are advised to explore the connections between the LPC, dACC, and parietal lobe, rather than structural measurements.

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Dyslexia: Related Behaviors and Neuronal Abnormalities

BSC-Ursa Minor 8

Dyslexia is a learning disability known for inhibiting a child’s ability to read and write, despite showing normal intelligence, but there may be more to this deficit than what it seems. Countless studies have found that children with reading disabilities (RD) display a variety of behavioral problems compared to their non-dyslexic counterparts. Even with this knowledge it remains unclear as to why these complications occur. This study focuses on identifying problems in attention, adaptability, and social skills in a sample of reading disabled children. Additionally, the study aims to identify the source for these issues by examining the Lateral Prefrontal Cortex, the Dorsal Anterior Cingulate Cortex, and Parietal Lobe. Neuronal data was obtained from 60 children who were scanned using structural magnetic resonance imaging, whereas their parents provided behavioral data through the BRIEF, CBCL, and Vineland-II. Parents of dyslexic children reported more problems in attention, compared to parents of non-dyslexic children. Results were not significant for social and adaptive behavior. Neuronal comparisons also yielded no significant differences. It is clear that dyslexic children display a higher amount of problems with attention, but it is unclear as to why this is so. It’s possible that structural measurements are unrelated to the problems that manifest in dyslexia. Instead, these issues may come from the pathways that form during development. Future studies are advised to explore the connections between the LPC, dACC, and parietal lobe, rather than structural measurements.