Presentation Title

A cross-cultural comparison of the relationship between motivation and performance in math and science

Faculty Mentor

Chong Ho Yu

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 9

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Prior research suggests that motivation, including intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, is the key to effective math and science learning. In this study international assessment data, including 2011 Trends for International Study of Math and Science (TIMSS) and 2016 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), were utilized to examine the relationship between motivation-related variables and test performance in math and science. Asian countries/regions (Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Japan, and South Korea) and USA were selected for cross-cultural comparison. Because the sample size of these international assessments is very large, data visualization and data mining, which are based on pattern recognition, instead of hypothesis testing, were employed as the primary tools for this study. The data reveal that extrinsic motivation does not necessarily predict performance, especially in USA. According to 2011 TIMSS, whether US Grade 8 students agreed that math can help in their daily life, whether they need math to learn other subjects, and whether they need math to get the job they want have no impact on their math performance. A similar pattern was also found in 2011 TIMSS science test data. By the same token, 2016 PISA does not show a significant association between instrumental motivation and math/science test scores. Rather, interest in broad science topics and enjoyment of science are powerful predictors of PISA math and science test performance. Cultural differences between Asians and Americans in motivation for math and science will be discussed in this presentation.

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

A cross-cultural comparison of the relationship between motivation and performance in math and science

BSC-Ursa Minor 9

Prior research suggests that motivation, including intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, is the key to effective math and science learning. In this study international assessment data, including 2011 Trends for International Study of Math and Science (TIMSS) and 2016 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), were utilized to examine the relationship between motivation-related variables and test performance in math and science. Asian countries/regions (Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Japan, and South Korea) and USA were selected for cross-cultural comparison. Because the sample size of these international assessments is very large, data visualization and data mining, which are based on pattern recognition, instead of hypothesis testing, were employed as the primary tools for this study. The data reveal that extrinsic motivation does not necessarily predict performance, especially in USA. According to 2011 TIMSS, whether US Grade 8 students agreed that math can help in their daily life, whether they need math to learn other subjects, and whether they need math to get the job they want have no impact on their math performance. A similar pattern was also found in 2011 TIMSS science test data. By the same token, 2016 PISA does not show a significant association between instrumental motivation and math/science test scores. Rather, interest in broad science topics and enjoyment of science are powerful predictors of PISA math and science test performance. Cultural differences between Asians and Americans in motivation for math and science will be discussed in this presentation.