Presentation Title

Function of SBE3 in Arabidopsis Starch Synthesis

Faculty Mentor

Susan Blauth

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 51

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Starch branching enzymes (SBEs) form branch points in starch, creating more ends of glucose chains available for starch synthesis. Although the roles of SBE2.1 and SBE2.2 in the model plant Arabidopsis have been characterized, the role of SBE3 is unclear. Sbe3 mutants have been shown to respond differently to added sugars as compared to wild-type controls. These results suggest that glucose is likely serving as a signal or as an energy source, revealing possible functions for Sbe3 in sugar signaling or starch synthesis. However, under our light conditions our lab observed a similar response by sbe3 mutants and wild-type controls when grown with added glucose. To clarify the response of sbe3 mutants to glucose, we repeated this experiment under varying light intensity. When light intensity was increased, we observed a distinct response of sbe3 mutants to glucose as compared to wild-type controls. This difference in glucose response will allow further investigations as to the specific role of SBE3 in the cell.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Function of SBE3 in Arabidopsis Starch Synthesis

BSC-Ursa Minor 51

Starch branching enzymes (SBEs) form branch points in starch, creating more ends of glucose chains available for starch synthesis. Although the roles of SBE2.1 and SBE2.2 in the model plant Arabidopsis have been characterized, the role of SBE3 is unclear. Sbe3 mutants have been shown to respond differently to added sugars as compared to wild-type controls. These results suggest that glucose is likely serving as a signal or as an energy source, revealing possible functions for Sbe3 in sugar signaling or starch synthesis. However, under our light conditions our lab observed a similar response by sbe3 mutants and wild-type controls when grown with added glucose. To clarify the response of sbe3 mutants to glucose, we repeated this experiment under varying light intensity. When light intensity was increased, we observed a distinct response of sbe3 mutants to glucose as compared to wild-type controls. This difference in glucose response will allow further investigations as to the specific role of SBE3 in the cell.