Presentation Title

Genetic Variation, Biogeography, and Population Status of Silver Garden Spider (Argiope argentata)

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Martina Ramirez

Start Date

18-11-2017 9:59 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 67

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

In a study of the phylogeny and biogeography of the fossorial coastal dune spider Lutica, Ramirez & Beckwitt (1995) found that the mainland populations of new species A and B are only about 57 km. apart at their southern and northern boundaries respectively [between La Jolla Beach, Ventura County and the Ballona Wetlands, Los Angeles County], yet spiders from these regions are members of different taxa. To determine if this north-south disjunction is also seen in other southern California arachnids, we are investigating the genetic differentiation and biogeography of silver garden spiders (Argiope argentata), a species whose distribution includes coastal populations both north and south of the Ballona Wetlands. During 2015-2016, 550 A. argentata were sampled from 13 populations (Los Angeles Co. - San Diego Co.). During SURP 2017, we genotyped 130 of them for variation at 8 enzyme loci. Of these, the AAT-B locus displays a regional pattern, with allele A very common in most populations south of Palos Verdes Drive South (PVD, Los Angeles Co.) and allele C being common at PVD and most populations to the north. This pattern may reflect the influence of the historic north-south biogeographic disjunction noted by Ramirez & Beckwitt (1995).

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Nov 18th, 9:59 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Genetic Variation, Biogeography, and Population Status of Silver Garden Spider (Argiope argentata)

BSC-Ursa Minor 67

In a study of the phylogeny and biogeography of the fossorial coastal dune spider Lutica, Ramirez & Beckwitt (1995) found that the mainland populations of new species A and B are only about 57 km. apart at their southern and northern boundaries respectively [between La Jolla Beach, Ventura County and the Ballona Wetlands, Los Angeles County], yet spiders from these regions are members of different taxa. To determine if this north-south disjunction is also seen in other southern California arachnids, we are investigating the genetic differentiation and biogeography of silver garden spiders (Argiope argentata), a species whose distribution includes coastal populations both north and south of the Ballona Wetlands. During 2015-2016, 550 A. argentata were sampled from 13 populations (Los Angeles Co. - San Diego Co.). During SURP 2017, we genotyped 130 of them for variation at 8 enzyme loci. Of these, the AAT-B locus displays a regional pattern, with allele A very common in most populations south of Palos Verdes Drive South (PVD, Los Angeles Co.) and allele C being common at PVD and most populations to the north. This pattern may reflect the influence of the historic north-south biogeographic disjunction noted by Ramirez & Beckwitt (1995).