Presentation Title

Inaction of Taking Action

Faculty Mentor

Ann Gordon

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 26

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Terrorism domestically and abroad has always been a policy concern for Americans, but where policy fails to cover the spread, prevention of such heinous acts demands responsibility from the people. Therefore, the importance of individual contributions in reporting terrorist activities is vital in researching prevention tactics, especially in light of recent events. Using data from FEMA’s See Something Saw Something campaign, as well as information provided by The Chapman University Survey on American Fears, this paper aims to examine the unspecified reasoning that drives the lack of reportage on terrorist activities by the general public. Certain indicators of suspicious activity trigger the level of action people take - dependent on how strong the aforementioned indicator is. By determining which indicators are most relevant precursors to an attack, educators can delve into connecting those with prevalent public perceptions of what constitutes suspicious activity. Findings suggest most individuals would actively report familiar crimes (i.e. shoplifting), but falter when deciding whether to report suspicious activities and actions (i.e. unusual inquiries about security procedures). Many studies suggest an apparent under-reporting bias ranging from trivial terrorist activities to tangible full-blown events. Instances such as fear of accusing someone innocent and retaliation are examples of observed impediments to reporting. Furthermore, these findings all point to a loftier presence of terrorist activity in the everyday lives average citizens than what they can realistically observe. Given the pervasiveness of the issue, addressing this issue from a bottom-top approach is this paper’s means for establishing a more productive public.

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Inaction of Taking Action

BSC-Ursa Minor 26

Terrorism domestically and abroad has always been a policy concern for Americans, but where policy fails to cover the spread, prevention of such heinous acts demands responsibility from the people. Therefore, the importance of individual contributions in reporting terrorist activities is vital in researching prevention tactics, especially in light of recent events. Using data from FEMA’s See Something Saw Something campaign, as well as information provided by The Chapman University Survey on American Fears, this paper aims to examine the unspecified reasoning that drives the lack of reportage on terrorist activities by the general public. Certain indicators of suspicious activity trigger the level of action people take - dependent on how strong the aforementioned indicator is. By determining which indicators are most relevant precursors to an attack, educators can delve into connecting those with prevalent public perceptions of what constitutes suspicious activity. Findings suggest most individuals would actively report familiar crimes (i.e. shoplifting), but falter when deciding whether to report suspicious activities and actions (i.e. unusual inquiries about security procedures). Many studies suggest an apparent under-reporting bias ranging from trivial terrorist activities to tangible full-blown events. Instances such as fear of accusing someone innocent and retaliation are examples of observed impediments to reporting. Furthermore, these findings all point to a loftier presence of terrorist activity in the everyday lives average citizens than what they can realistically observe. Given the pervasiveness of the issue, addressing this issue from a bottom-top approach is this paper’s means for establishing a more productive public.