Presentation Title

Induced Vestibular Dysfunction Using Oculus Rift Virtual Reality Wide-Angle Head Mounted Display: A Proof-of-Concept

Faculty Mentor

Hamid R. Djalilian, M.D.

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 84

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

The vestibular system of the inner ear primarily serves as a feedback loop for orientation and rotation of the head (balance), and processes and integrates the plethora of information received from the proprioceptive and visual sensory systems to maintain stable vision and posture. Recently, the onset of virtual reality (VR) wide-angled head mounted displays (i.e., Oculus Rift, Samsung Gear VR) has emerged as a powerful platform for human-computer interactions, and has been found to have a high degree of consumer immersion in a virtual environment. Specifically, the Oculus Rift VR headset tracks spatial orientation and head movement through its integrated accelerometers and gyros. Although motion within a virtual environment, commonly known as cyberspace, can serve purposes for entertainment and educational instruction, it has been shown to result in clinical symptoms of motion sickness (i.e. nausea and vomiting) for many users (cybersickness). Although Oculus Rift has been used widely in gaming applications, we envisioned its potential medical applications. The goal of this project is to use the Oculus Rift VR headset as a platform to monitor vestibular and other associated changes in individuals immersed in cyberspace. We have integrated the Oculus Rift platform with a Microsoft Kinect and added a custom eye-tracking camera, controlled by an Arduino, to monitor balance, rapid eye-movement (nystagmus), body posture, and angular sway of individuals. To our knowledge, no other study has used Oculus Rift, an integrated Microsoft Kinect, and a custom eye-tracking camera to evaluate vestibular dysfunction in individuals in a virtual environment.

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Induced Vestibular Dysfunction Using Oculus Rift Virtual Reality Wide-Angle Head Mounted Display: A Proof-of-Concept

BSC-Ursa Minor 84

The vestibular system of the inner ear primarily serves as a feedback loop for orientation and rotation of the head (balance), and processes and integrates the plethora of information received from the proprioceptive and visual sensory systems to maintain stable vision and posture. Recently, the onset of virtual reality (VR) wide-angled head mounted displays (i.e., Oculus Rift, Samsung Gear VR) has emerged as a powerful platform for human-computer interactions, and has been found to have a high degree of consumer immersion in a virtual environment. Specifically, the Oculus Rift VR headset tracks spatial orientation and head movement through its integrated accelerometers and gyros. Although motion within a virtual environment, commonly known as cyberspace, can serve purposes for entertainment and educational instruction, it has been shown to result in clinical symptoms of motion sickness (i.e. nausea and vomiting) for many users (cybersickness). Although Oculus Rift has been used widely in gaming applications, we envisioned its potential medical applications. The goal of this project is to use the Oculus Rift VR headset as a platform to monitor vestibular and other associated changes in individuals immersed in cyberspace. We have integrated the Oculus Rift platform with a Microsoft Kinect and added a custom eye-tracking camera, controlled by an Arduino, to monitor balance, rapid eye-movement (nystagmus), body posture, and angular sway of individuals. To our knowledge, no other study has used Oculus Rift, an integrated Microsoft Kinect, and a custom eye-tracking camera to evaluate vestibular dysfunction in individuals in a virtual environment.