Presentation Title

Insignificant Amounts of Species Diversity Found Among Red and Brown Algae in Wave-Exposed vs. Rocky Areas

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Hector Valenzuela, Dr. Alvin Alejandrino

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 60

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Marine herbivores can affect algae’s relative fitness and abundance. Algae's role as a primary producer makes it a critical object of study because small organisms use it as a primary food source. If small organisms graze unevenly, it can affect the algae’s overall fitness. Algae has developed mechanisms of tolerance, resistance, and secondary metabolites to help it deter predation and ultimately maintain or increase their relative fitness. Other determining factors that affect algal survival entail reproductive zones and refuge, as well as ability to withstand wave currents. This study was conducted at Cabrillo Beach in San Pedro, CA. The objective was to focus on species diversity within rocky and wave-exposed areas for both red and brown algae types to determine if an effect from herbivores was experienced in any areas. The investigation consisted of ten plot areas sectioned off with a quadrat and a manual count of organisms within two subject groups (rocky versus wave-exposed areas). A t-test was utilized, along with a Shannon-Weaver Index (SWI), and finially an ANOVA to determine that there was no significance in species diversity within either group (F-ratio= 0.755, df: 3, 36, p-value = 0.05). It was important to determine whether there were any significant changes in species diversity in order to track any potential threats to the algae and overall ecosystem. In the event that a given area is experiencing low species diversity, it is possible that one species could be disrupting the balance needed for algae to sustain its dependent organisms.

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Insignificant Amounts of Species Diversity Found Among Red and Brown Algae in Wave-Exposed vs. Rocky Areas

BSC-Ursa Minor 60

Marine herbivores can affect algae’s relative fitness and abundance. Algae's role as a primary producer makes it a critical object of study because small organisms use it as a primary food source. If small organisms graze unevenly, it can affect the algae’s overall fitness. Algae has developed mechanisms of tolerance, resistance, and secondary metabolites to help it deter predation and ultimately maintain or increase their relative fitness. Other determining factors that affect algal survival entail reproductive zones and refuge, as well as ability to withstand wave currents. This study was conducted at Cabrillo Beach in San Pedro, CA. The objective was to focus on species diversity within rocky and wave-exposed areas for both red and brown algae types to determine if an effect from herbivores was experienced in any areas. The investigation consisted of ten plot areas sectioned off with a quadrat and a manual count of organisms within two subject groups (rocky versus wave-exposed areas). A t-test was utilized, along with a Shannon-Weaver Index (SWI), and finially an ANOVA to determine that there was no significance in species diversity within either group (F-ratio= 0.755, df: 3, 36, p-value = 0.05). It was important to determine whether there were any significant changes in species diversity in order to track any potential threats to the algae and overall ecosystem. In the event that a given area is experiencing low species diversity, it is possible that one species could be disrupting the balance needed for algae to sustain its dependent organisms.