Presentation Title

Investigating the Presence and Quantity of Immune Cells in Canine Tumors

Faculty Mentor

Chad L. Barber

Start Date

18-11-2017 9:59 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 70

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Immune cells in the microenvironment of canine tumors requires further study. Therefore, we investigated the quantity and presence of immune cells in canine tumors. We hypothesized that the quantity of immune cells present in canine tumors are similar to comparable cell types found in human tumors in the literature. Six fresh canine tumors were received from veterinarians and then processed to achieve a single cell suspension. A portion of the processed tumor cells were grown in cell culture to attempt to produce an immortal cell line. Cells from a canine papilloma tumor grew in culture until passage four with loss of contact inhibition, and visible foci, but died due to possibly reaching the Hayflick limit. All other primary tumor cells lived an average of one passage in cell culture. A different portion of the processed cells in four of the tumors were stained with fluorescently-labeled antibodies (anti-CD45R, -CD8a, or -F4/80) to identify immune cells. The stained cells were analyzed by flow cytometry to determine cell types present. In various tumors we identified hematopoietic cells (2.47% CD45R+), Macrophages (3.94% F4/80+), and Cytotoxic T-cells (6.70% CD45R+CD8a+, and 4.94% CD8a+). We concluded cytotoxic T-cells are an important part of the canine tumor microenvironment, due to their high proportions in some tumors. The project will continue to test more canine tumors for comparison to human tumors from the literature.

Summary of research results to be presented

We were able to identify immune cell types by flow cytometry data from four of the tumors received. We identified hematopoietic cells (2.47% CD45R+), Macrophages (3.94% F4/80+), and Cytotoxic T-cells (6.70% CD45R+CD8a+, and 4.94% CD8a+). We were also able to have primary tumor cells grow in cell culture in vitro.

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Nov 18th, 9:59 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Investigating the Presence and Quantity of Immune Cells in Canine Tumors

BSC-Ursa Minor 70

Immune cells in the microenvironment of canine tumors requires further study. Therefore, we investigated the quantity and presence of immune cells in canine tumors. We hypothesized that the quantity of immune cells present in canine tumors are similar to comparable cell types found in human tumors in the literature. Six fresh canine tumors were received from veterinarians and then processed to achieve a single cell suspension. A portion of the processed tumor cells were grown in cell culture to attempt to produce an immortal cell line. Cells from a canine papilloma tumor grew in culture until passage four with loss of contact inhibition, and visible foci, but died due to possibly reaching the Hayflick limit. All other primary tumor cells lived an average of one passage in cell culture. A different portion of the processed cells in four of the tumors were stained with fluorescently-labeled antibodies (anti-CD45R, -CD8a, or -F4/80) to identify immune cells. The stained cells were analyzed by flow cytometry to determine cell types present. In various tumors we identified hematopoietic cells (2.47% CD45R+), Macrophages (3.94% F4/80+), and Cytotoxic T-cells (6.70% CD45R+CD8a+, and 4.94% CD8a+). We concluded cytotoxic T-cells are an important part of the canine tumor microenvironment, due to their high proportions in some tumors. The project will continue to test more canine tumors for comparison to human tumors from the literature.