Presentation Title

Latino Early Childhood Education Enrollment in the Golden and Tar Heel States

Faculty Mentor

Luis A. Sanchez, Assistant Professor of Sociology, California State University Channel Islands

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 15

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Submitting Author: Ericka Magana Mendez, California State University Channel Islands

Title: Latino Early Childhood Education Enrollment in the Golden and Tar Heel States

Type: Poster

Discipline: Sociology

Faculty Mentor(s): Luis Sanchez, Assistant Professor of Sociology, California State University Channel Islands

My research compares enrollment in Early Childhood Education (ECE) between Latinos in traditional settlement area and those in what can be considered a “new destination.” Early childhood programs are important because they can increase student readiness upon entering elementary school and it can help bridge the academic achievement gap between Latinos and their white counterparts since the academic achievement gap is present even before the child enters kindergarten or first grade. New destinations are places that are not originally thought to contain a large Latino population but in reality, they have experienced a substantial growth in their Latino population. North Carolina represents a new destination for Latinos. “Previous studies have found that Spanish-speaking children in North Carolina have immensely benefitted from programs like Head State and public Pre-K (Graham 2014).” Latinos are a growing population in the United States especially in new destinations. It is important to know if the places are able to adapt successfully to the needs of the changing demographics. If this population is not receiving equal access to resources, such as education and health care then, there should be some policy changes. I use individual-level data from the 2011-2015 American Community Survey (5-year estimates) for children ages 4 to5 in California and North Carolina. My preliminary results indicate that although nearly 60% of Latino children in California are enrolled in an early childhood education program under 50% of Latino children are not enrolled in a pre-k program. My future work will explore other contextual variables, such as parents’ immigrant status and education, that might account for these geographic differences.

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Latino Early Childhood Education Enrollment in the Golden and Tar Heel States

BSC-Ursa Minor 15

Submitting Author: Ericka Magana Mendez, California State University Channel Islands

Title: Latino Early Childhood Education Enrollment in the Golden and Tar Heel States

Type: Poster

Discipline: Sociology

Faculty Mentor(s): Luis Sanchez, Assistant Professor of Sociology, California State University Channel Islands

My research compares enrollment in Early Childhood Education (ECE) between Latinos in traditional settlement area and those in what can be considered a “new destination.” Early childhood programs are important because they can increase student readiness upon entering elementary school and it can help bridge the academic achievement gap between Latinos and their white counterparts since the academic achievement gap is present even before the child enters kindergarten or first grade. New destinations are places that are not originally thought to contain a large Latino population but in reality, they have experienced a substantial growth in their Latino population. North Carolina represents a new destination for Latinos. “Previous studies have found that Spanish-speaking children in North Carolina have immensely benefitted from programs like Head State and public Pre-K (Graham 2014).” Latinos are a growing population in the United States especially in new destinations. It is important to know if the places are able to adapt successfully to the needs of the changing demographics. If this population is not receiving equal access to resources, such as education and health care then, there should be some policy changes. I use individual-level data from the 2011-2015 American Community Survey (5-year estimates) for children ages 4 to5 in California and North Carolina. My preliminary results indicate that although nearly 60% of Latino children in California are enrolled in an early childhood education program under 50% of Latino children are not enrolled in a pre-k program. My future work will explore other contextual variables, such as parents’ immigrant status and education, that might account for these geographic differences.