Presentation Title

Low-cost Microfluidic Devices for Nonequilibrium Biophysical Measurements

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Wylie Ahmed

Start Date

18-11-2017 9:59 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 147

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Microfluidics is a field of research that involves manipulating micron-scale volumes of fluids. Microfluidic devices have many applications; in our lab, we use microfluidic devices for biophysical measurements to characterize active colloids and biomolecules such as R-bodies. In this study, there are two parts: developing a low cost microfluidic device and using the devices to study biophysical dynamics. To create a low-cost microfluidic device in the lab, we implement a method pioneered by Michelle Khine at UCI which utilizes inexpensive equipment. Materials needed to build a functioning chip are: an oven, a handheld Corona discharger, Shrinky-Dinks, and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The first part of this study has been implemented, and in matter of minutes, a complete microfluidic device can be made. In part two, we use the devices for to study two nonequilibrium systems: Active colloids and R-bodies. Active colloids are spherical beads that have a hematite cube embedded in them to create a Janus particle. These active colloids, under equilibrium conditions, undergo Brownian motion; however, when the particles are illuminated with blue light, they self-propel and generate active motion. We use microfluidic devices to study the dynamics of active colloids under flow. An R-body is a biomolecule that can behave like a mechanical piston. Under certain conditions, the protein remains in a coiled form, but when the pH changes, the protein expands into a tube in a piston-like manner. In our study, we use a laser tweezer system to measure the force kinetics as the R-body transitions between different states. Our low-cost microfluidic devices allow us to study the microscale motion and force dynamics of active colloids and active-biomolecules.

Summary of research results to be presented

Our study consists of two parts: develop a low cost microfluidic device and using the devices to to study biophysical dynamics. So far, the devices are functional and in matter of minutes, a complete device can be fabricated.

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Nov 18th, 9:59 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Low-cost Microfluidic Devices for Nonequilibrium Biophysical Measurements

BSC-Ursa Minor 147

Microfluidics is a field of research that involves manipulating micron-scale volumes of fluids. Microfluidic devices have many applications; in our lab, we use microfluidic devices for biophysical measurements to characterize active colloids and biomolecules such as R-bodies. In this study, there are two parts: developing a low cost microfluidic device and using the devices to study biophysical dynamics. To create a low-cost microfluidic device in the lab, we implement a method pioneered by Michelle Khine at UCI which utilizes inexpensive equipment. Materials needed to build a functioning chip are: an oven, a handheld Corona discharger, Shrinky-Dinks, and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The first part of this study has been implemented, and in matter of minutes, a complete microfluidic device can be made. In part two, we use the devices for to study two nonequilibrium systems: Active colloids and R-bodies. Active colloids are spherical beads that have a hematite cube embedded in them to create a Janus particle. These active colloids, under equilibrium conditions, undergo Brownian motion; however, when the particles are illuminated with blue light, they self-propel and generate active motion. We use microfluidic devices to study the dynamics of active colloids under flow. An R-body is a biomolecule that can behave like a mechanical piston. Under certain conditions, the protein remains in a coiled form, but when the pH changes, the protein expands into a tube in a piston-like manner. In our study, we use a laser tweezer system to measure the force kinetics as the R-body transitions between different states. Our low-cost microfluidic devices allow us to study the microscale motion and force dynamics of active colloids and active-biomolecules.