Presentation Title

Active Dopants in an Amorphous Silicon Layer

Faculty Mentor

William Wiegand, Zachary Holman

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 79

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

For silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells, there is currently no known relationship between gas flow and doping density. When applying dopants to a (SHJ) solar cell the contact resistance goes down as gas flow increase, but past 18 standard cubic centimeters per minute (sccms) the contact resistance begins to increase. Figuring out the relationship between gas flow and active dopant density may help the development of solar cells. In this research experiment, we tried to develop a method of calculating the concentration of active dopants in an amorphous silicon (a-Si) layer. We tried three different methods to measure the number of active dopants: fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, transition line measurements (TLM), and Hall effect measurements. Hall effect measurements proved to be a poor test, while TLM and FTIR measurements showed some results. Our method of measuring the amount of dopants, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), proved to be a successful providing excellent results. While none of the methods for measuring active dopants yielded completely accurate results, improvements to the tests have been conceived. The results we gathered showed that a small percentage of dopants applied to the a-Si layer became active dopants.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Active Dopants in an Amorphous Silicon Layer

BSC-Ursa Minor 79

For silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells, there is currently no known relationship between gas flow and doping density. When applying dopants to a (SHJ) solar cell the contact resistance goes down as gas flow increase, but past 18 standard cubic centimeters per minute (sccms) the contact resistance begins to increase. Figuring out the relationship between gas flow and active dopant density may help the development of solar cells. In this research experiment, we tried to develop a method of calculating the concentration of active dopants in an amorphous silicon (a-Si) layer. We tried three different methods to measure the number of active dopants: fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, transition line measurements (TLM), and Hall effect measurements. Hall effect measurements proved to be a poor test, while TLM and FTIR measurements showed some results. Our method of measuring the amount of dopants, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), proved to be a successful providing excellent results. While none of the methods for measuring active dopants yielded completely accurate results, improvements to the tests have been conceived. The results we gathered showed that a small percentage of dopants applied to the a-Si layer became active dopants.