Presentation Title

Novel Utilization of 3-D Printing to Optimize the Beating of P19.CL6 Cells in A Fibrin Matrix

Faculty Mentor

Dr. James Harber

Start Date

18-11-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

18-11-2017 11:00 AM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 46

Session

Poster 1

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Cardiac tissue regeneration occurs naturally in the body through the assistance of circulating stem cells in the blood and fibrin formed through polymerization of fibrinogen and thrombin. The normal repair rate for cardiac tissue is sub-optimal to restore the impaired heart function associated with aging or injury. Human clinical trials have shown that a patient’s own cardiac cells differentiated in vitro and transplanted autologously can improve cardiac function. However, autologous transplanted tissue remains microscopic and lacking pacemaker tissue. This study hypothesized fibrin polymerized in linear strands and beating cardiac cells could be used to produce small millimeter sized beating muscles. The hypothesis was tested using P19.CL6 mouse cells grown to five day Embryoid Bodies (EBs) on ultra-low adherence surfaces in cell culture. These were cultivated in tissue culture for fourteen days in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a cardiogenesis differentiation factor to initiate synchronous beating. Computer aided design (CAD) and various suture materials (silk, catgut, poly) were used reiteratively to refine the model substrate to support the cells and fibrin matrix. After succeeding rounds of 3D CAD substrate development, optimal shapes supported appropriate fibrin polymerization of cell infused structures which grew to small cardiac tissues. This research provides an important extension to the paradigm of belief that in vitro approaches to cardiac regeneration will benefit humans through noninvasive autologous cell therapies. Supporting new approaches such as the clinically proven noninvasive heart autologous stem cell therapies require new training approaches, including the injury repair cell therapy model described in this research for supporting cardiac patient rehabilitation.

Summary of research results to be presented

Using P19.CL6 mouse cells, we grew them to five day Embryoid Bodies (EBs) on ultra-low adherence surfaces in cell culture. These were cultivated in tissue culture for fourteen days in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a cardiogenesis differentiation factor to initiate synchronous beating. On the fourteenth day we indeed achieved beating cardiac cells. Computer aided design (CAD) and various suture materials (silk, catgut, poly) were used interactively to refine the model substrate to support the cells and fibrin matrix. Fourteen days of cultivation on 3D CAD substrates with suture material produced beating cardiac cells in the linear pattern. Our results supported our hypothesis.

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Nov 18th, 10:00 AM Nov 18th, 11:00 AM

Novel Utilization of 3-D Printing to Optimize the Beating of P19.CL6 Cells in A Fibrin Matrix

BSC-Ursa Minor 46

Cardiac tissue regeneration occurs naturally in the body through the assistance of circulating stem cells in the blood and fibrin formed through polymerization of fibrinogen and thrombin. The normal repair rate for cardiac tissue is sub-optimal to restore the impaired heart function associated with aging or injury. Human clinical trials have shown that a patient’s own cardiac cells differentiated in vitro and transplanted autologously can improve cardiac function. However, autologous transplanted tissue remains microscopic and lacking pacemaker tissue. This study hypothesized fibrin polymerized in linear strands and beating cardiac cells could be used to produce small millimeter sized beating muscles. The hypothesis was tested using P19.CL6 mouse cells grown to five day Embryoid Bodies (EBs) on ultra-low adherence surfaces in cell culture. These were cultivated in tissue culture for fourteen days in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a cardiogenesis differentiation factor to initiate synchronous beating. Computer aided design (CAD) and various suture materials (silk, catgut, poly) were used reiteratively to refine the model substrate to support the cells and fibrin matrix. After succeeding rounds of 3D CAD substrate development, optimal shapes supported appropriate fibrin polymerization of cell infused structures which grew to small cardiac tissues. This research provides an important extension to the paradigm of belief that in vitro approaches to cardiac regeneration will benefit humans through noninvasive autologous cell therapies. Supporting new approaches such as the clinically proven noninvasive heart autologous stem cell therapies require new training approaches, including the injury repair cell therapy model described in this research for supporting cardiac patient rehabilitation.