Presentation Title

Auditory Middle Latency Response Changes in a Rodent Repeat-Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Model

Faculty Mentor

Brian J. Cummings, Ph.D., Harrison W. Lin, M.D.

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 43

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) results from direct physical trauma to the head and accounts for over 75% of known emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and deaths in the United States due to TBI. mTBI results in a variety of well-known cognitive and physiological deficits, though the changes to the auditory system remain less well understood. We investigate changes in central auditory processing in a rodent model of repeat-mTBI (rmTBI). Middle latency response (MLR) changes were measured across five-timepoints pre (baseline) and post (day 1, week 1, week 3, and week 5) injury at four frequencies (8kHz, 16kHz, 24kHz, and 32kHz). A stimulus intensity of 80 dB was presented to three different groups (sham [n=7], 5-Hit [n=8], and 10-Hit [n=8]). Using a 3x5 repeated-measures mixed ANOVA, with Tukey HSD post-hoc pairwise comparisons, between-group significant differences at week1 were found between 10-Hit and 5-Hit at all frequencies (p<0.01), and between 5-Hit and sham at 8kHz, 16kHz, and 24kHz (p<0.05). In addition, within-group significant differences (p<0.001) were found comparing week 1 to baseline MLR at all frequencies for 10-Hit group only. No significant differences were found between week 5 and baseline for 10-Hit, indicating a reversal to baseline over time. These preliminary results suggest that a significant degree of damage to the auditory system can be observed as early as 1-week post-injury. Studies to further understand the influence of head injury on central auditory processing are warranted, as central auditory processing changes remain poorly understood.

Keywords: traumatic brain injury; hearing loss; auditory system; middle-latency response

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

Auditory Middle Latency Response Changes in a Rodent Repeat-Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Model

BSC-Ursa Minor 43

Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) results from direct physical trauma to the head and accounts for over 75% of known emergency room visits, hospitalizations, and deaths in the United States due to TBI. mTBI results in a variety of well-known cognitive and physiological deficits, though the changes to the auditory system remain less well understood. We investigate changes in central auditory processing in a rodent model of repeat-mTBI (rmTBI). Middle latency response (MLR) changes were measured across five-timepoints pre (baseline) and post (day 1, week 1, week 3, and week 5) injury at four frequencies (8kHz, 16kHz, 24kHz, and 32kHz). A stimulus intensity of 80 dB was presented to three different groups (sham [n=7], 5-Hit [n=8], and 10-Hit [n=8]). Using a 3x5 repeated-measures mixed ANOVA, with Tukey HSD post-hoc pairwise comparisons, between-group significant differences at week1 were found between 10-Hit and 5-Hit at all frequencies (p<0.01), and between 5-Hit and sham at 8kHz, 16kHz, and 24kHz (p<0.05). In addition, within-group significant differences (p<0.001) were found comparing week 1 to baseline MLR at all frequencies for 10-Hit group only. No significant differences were found between week 5 and baseline for 10-Hit, indicating a reversal to baseline over time. These preliminary results suggest that a significant degree of damage to the auditory system can be observed as early as 1-week post-injury. Studies to further understand the influence of head injury on central auditory processing are warranted, as central auditory processing changes remain poorly understood.

Keywords: traumatic brain injury; hearing loss; auditory system; middle-latency response