Presentation Title

Prescription Stimulant Misuse Avoidance Self-Efficacy: Correlates and Moderation by Race/Ethnicity

Faculty Mentor

Niloofar Bavarian

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 21

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

The illicit use of prescription stimulants (IUPS) is an emerging public health issue at college campuses across the United States. Prescription stimulant avoidance self-efficacy is a proximal-level correlate of IUPS, and thus its correlates should be understood. To date, however, correlates of avoidance self-efficacy have not been thoroughly examined. The study aimed to investigate whether personality characteristics (e.g., inattention, hyperactivity, and sensation seeking), psychological distress, and religiosity are associated with prescription stimulant avoidance self-efficacy, and if these relationships are moderated by gender and race/ethnicity. The data were obtained from a probability sample of 1,053 students attending two California universities. Given the skewed nature of our outcome variable we used tobit regression to examine associations between these variables and avoidance self-efficacy. Inattention, hyperactivity, sensation seeking and psychological distress were inversely associated with avoidance self-efficacy. Religiosity was found to have a direct association with avoidance self-efficacy. Although these relationships were not moderated by gender, there was moderation by race/ethnicity. Specifically, increased levels of inattention was a risk factor for students identifying as White, but not students identifying as Asian. Also, religiosity was a risk factor for Latinos (increased religiosity was associated with decreased self-efficacy) and a protective factor for students identifying as White (increased religiosity was associated with increased self-efficacy). Findings suggest prescription stimulant avoidance self-efficacy is affected by personality, psychological distress, religiosity. In addition, some of these relationships were moderated race/ethnicity. Prevention implications will be discussed.

Prescription stimulants, avoidance self-efficacy, personality, psychological distress, religiosity

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

Prescription Stimulant Misuse Avoidance Self-Efficacy: Correlates and Moderation by Race/Ethnicity

BSC-Ursa Minor 21

The illicit use of prescription stimulants (IUPS) is an emerging public health issue at college campuses across the United States. Prescription stimulant avoidance self-efficacy is a proximal-level correlate of IUPS, and thus its correlates should be understood. To date, however, correlates of avoidance self-efficacy have not been thoroughly examined. The study aimed to investigate whether personality characteristics (e.g., inattention, hyperactivity, and sensation seeking), psychological distress, and religiosity are associated with prescription stimulant avoidance self-efficacy, and if these relationships are moderated by gender and race/ethnicity. The data were obtained from a probability sample of 1,053 students attending two California universities. Given the skewed nature of our outcome variable we used tobit regression to examine associations between these variables and avoidance self-efficacy. Inattention, hyperactivity, sensation seeking and psychological distress were inversely associated with avoidance self-efficacy. Religiosity was found to have a direct association with avoidance self-efficacy. Although these relationships were not moderated by gender, there was moderation by race/ethnicity. Specifically, increased levels of inattention was a risk factor for students identifying as White, but not students identifying as Asian. Also, religiosity was a risk factor for Latinos (increased religiosity was associated with decreased self-efficacy) and a protective factor for students identifying as White (increased religiosity was associated with increased self-efficacy). Findings suggest prescription stimulant avoidance self-efficacy is affected by personality, psychological distress, religiosity. In addition, some of these relationships were moderated race/ethnicity. Prevention implications will be discussed.

Prescription stimulants, avoidance self-efficacy, personality, psychological distress, religiosity