Presentation Title

Standardization of an In Vitro Simulated Digestion Method to Assess the Stability of Emulsions and Release of Free Fatty Acids

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Gabriel Davidov-Pardo

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 61

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Standardization of an In Vitro Simulated Digestion Method to Assess the Stability of Emulsions and Release of Free Fatty Acids

Keywords: bioaccessibility, emulsion, digestion, free fatty acids, digestion, bioactive compounds

Bioaccessibility of both macro and micronutrients is essential for proper physiological functions in the human body. Determining the accessible amount of nutrients for biological function has drawn much interest as health concerns regarding food is becoming more prevalent. This study is focused on the in vitro digestion model pertaining to the emulsions in 2% milk. An in vitro digestion model provides accurate and comparable results without acquiring a living organism as a test subject. Through this study, the researcher provides a standardized method for quantifying the amount of free fatty acids in solubilized bioactive compounds contained within emulsions. For this study, the gastric and intestinal phases are analyzed, while the oral phase is left out due to its negligible amount of lipid digestion. A homeostatic body temperature of 37 °C is maintained during the two phases of the digestion model, with the addition of salts and enzymes (the gastric uses pepsin at pH 3 and the intestinal phase uses bile salts, pancreatin and lipase at pH 7). To assess the lipase and pancreatin enzymatic activity, 0.1 M NaOH is titrated to maintain a pH of 7.0. Both qualitative and quantitative results are achieved. Qualitative data is obtained through protein destabilization after the gastric phase and micelle formation throughout the intestinal phase. On average, 3.45 mL of 0.1 M NaOH were titrated in the intestinal phase, which represents that 90.7% free fatty acids are hydrolyzed from their glycerol backbone. These results indicate that this in vitro digestion model produces applicable results. Further research will be done using this standardized method with different emulsions to determine the bioaccessibility of certain nutrients.

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

Standardization of an In Vitro Simulated Digestion Method to Assess the Stability of Emulsions and Release of Free Fatty Acids

BSC-Ursa Minor 61

Standardization of an In Vitro Simulated Digestion Method to Assess the Stability of Emulsions and Release of Free Fatty Acids

Keywords: bioaccessibility, emulsion, digestion, free fatty acids, digestion, bioactive compounds

Bioaccessibility of both macro and micronutrients is essential for proper physiological functions in the human body. Determining the accessible amount of nutrients for biological function has drawn much interest as health concerns regarding food is becoming more prevalent. This study is focused on the in vitro digestion model pertaining to the emulsions in 2% milk. An in vitro digestion model provides accurate and comparable results without acquiring a living organism as a test subject. Through this study, the researcher provides a standardized method for quantifying the amount of free fatty acids in solubilized bioactive compounds contained within emulsions. For this study, the gastric and intestinal phases are analyzed, while the oral phase is left out due to its negligible amount of lipid digestion. A homeostatic body temperature of 37 °C is maintained during the two phases of the digestion model, with the addition of salts and enzymes (the gastric uses pepsin at pH 3 and the intestinal phase uses bile salts, pancreatin and lipase at pH 7). To assess the lipase and pancreatin enzymatic activity, 0.1 M NaOH is titrated to maintain a pH of 7.0. Both qualitative and quantitative results are achieved. Qualitative data is obtained through protein destabilization after the gastric phase and micelle formation throughout the intestinal phase. On average, 3.45 mL of 0.1 M NaOH were titrated in the intestinal phase, which represents that 90.7% free fatty acids are hydrolyzed from their glycerol backbone. These results indicate that this in vitro digestion model produces applicable results. Further research will be done using this standardized method with different emulsions to determine the bioaccessibility of certain nutrients.