Presentation Title

Sustainable Concrete: Reclaimed Water Quality Effect on Concrete’s Strength Development

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Monica Palomo, Dr. Rosa Vasconez, Professor John Forth

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 109

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

Concrete is one of the most used materials in construction. The common sources in a concrete mix are potable water, coarse aggregates, and fine aggregates. The production of concrete is not environmentally friendly due to high levels of CO2 emissions, high potable water consumption, and high energy requirements. Potable water is limited because of the high demands from irrigation, industry, and domestic. The purpose of this study was to determine if reclaimed water could be used as an alternative in concrete mix. The mechanical properties of concrete and mortar, such as compressive strength, compressive creep, and tensile creep, were investigated. The physical and chemical properties were examined through x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analysis, and back-scattered imaging. According to the British Standards (BS), the final effluent (FE) water was obtained from a local wastewater plant in Leeds, England. Concrete and mortar samples were casted with the usage of final effluent or tap water. The water-to-cement ratios were 0.474. The properties of concrete and mortar with the usage of Final Effluent water was compared to the samples created with tap water. The concrete and mortar samples containing final effluent water compressive strength, XRD analysis, back-scattered images did not show significant difference compared to the samples with tap water. The compressive strength of FE mortar samples at day 28 are approximately 12.4% stronger than tap water mortar samples. The compressive and tensile creep results of the concrete samples using FE water shows slight significant difference compared to the samples containing tap water. In conclusion, it is suggested that reclaimed water could be used as an alternative source in mortar and concrete mix.

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

Sustainable Concrete: Reclaimed Water Quality Effect on Concrete’s Strength Development

BSC-Ursa Minor 109

Concrete is one of the most used materials in construction. The common sources in a concrete mix are potable water, coarse aggregates, and fine aggregates. The production of concrete is not environmentally friendly due to high levels of CO2 emissions, high potable water consumption, and high energy requirements. Potable water is limited because of the high demands from irrigation, industry, and domestic. The purpose of this study was to determine if reclaimed water could be used as an alternative in concrete mix. The mechanical properties of concrete and mortar, such as compressive strength, compressive creep, and tensile creep, were investigated. The physical and chemical properties were examined through x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analysis, and back-scattered imaging. According to the British Standards (BS), the final effluent (FE) water was obtained from a local wastewater plant in Leeds, England. Concrete and mortar samples were casted with the usage of final effluent or tap water. The water-to-cement ratios were 0.474. The properties of concrete and mortar with the usage of Final Effluent water was compared to the samples created with tap water. The concrete and mortar samples containing final effluent water compressive strength, XRD analysis, back-scattered images did not show significant difference compared to the samples with tap water. The compressive strength of FE mortar samples at day 28 are approximately 12.4% stronger than tap water mortar samples. The compressive and tensile creep results of the concrete samples using FE water shows slight significant difference compared to the samples containing tap water. In conclusion, it is suggested that reclaimed water could be used as an alternative source in mortar and concrete mix.