Presentation Title

Broadband multilayer plasmonic structures

Faculty Mentor

Ildar Salakhutdinov, Ertan Salik

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 122

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

physical_mathematical_sciences

Abstract

Multilayer plasmonic structures consisting of alternating layers of metal and dielectric create a new type of guiding modes with very high effective refractive index and strong mode confinement. These properties allow for many applications in optical communications, sensing, biomedical engineering, and metrology. However, different applications require various wavelengths in a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum, and there is no known material with properties that allow a single device which works well over all wavelengths of interest. Using FEM simulations, we analyzed plasmonic structures using different plasmonic materials and established which materials yield acceptable properties in spectral regions from UV to IR. The results of these material characterizations may be useful in developing many different types of sensors, including biosensors.

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

Broadband multilayer plasmonic structures

BSC-Ursa Minor 122

Multilayer plasmonic structures consisting of alternating layers of metal and dielectric create a new type of guiding modes with very high effective refractive index and strong mode confinement. These properties allow for many applications in optical communications, sensing, biomedical engineering, and metrology. However, different applications require various wavelengths in a wide range of the electromagnetic spectrum, and there is no known material with properties that allow a single device which works well over all wavelengths of interest. Using FEM simulations, we analyzed plasmonic structures using different plasmonic materials and established which materials yield acceptable properties in spectral regions from UV to IR. The results of these material characterizations may be useful in developing many different types of sensors, including biosensors.