Presentation Title

The 1913 Alien Land Act and its Relationship to Donald Trump’s Travel Ban

Faculty Mentor

Sierra Powell

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 13

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

The 1913 Alien Land Act and its Relationship to Donald Trump’s Travel Ban

Keywords: legislation, Japanese, alien, discrimination, unconstitutional, ban

The Trump administration and its motif of thinly veiled discrimination has both gathered support and sparked outrage across the United States. One such controversial act is the administration’s most recent travel ban, dubbed “the Muslim ban.” A huge percentage of the American population is opposed to the ban due to its discriminatory nature; however, supporters of the ban believe that it is necessary to preserve national security. In order to understand the nature of the current political climate and decide the best course of action, it is imperative to gather empirical evidence by looking back into American political history. This study examined the relationship between fears propagated within a society and how it directly affects the formulation of certain discriminatory legislation. Using historical records from the early 1900’s, the study analyzed the 1913 Alien Land Act in California (ALAC), which barred people of ethnic minorities from owning land in the State. The research revealed a similarity between the ALAC and “the Muslim ban,” which were both enacted to target a specific minority group. The paper demonstrated America’s longstanding fear of foreigners and immigrants; using the repeal of the Alien Land Act, it proves that those fears are most often unjustifiable. In addition, it also illustrates the moral, social, and political implications of stigmatizing a select minority.

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

The 1913 Alien Land Act and its Relationship to Donald Trump’s Travel Ban

BSC-Ursa Minor 13

The 1913 Alien Land Act and its Relationship to Donald Trump’s Travel Ban

Keywords: legislation, Japanese, alien, discrimination, unconstitutional, ban

The Trump administration and its motif of thinly veiled discrimination has both gathered support and sparked outrage across the United States. One such controversial act is the administration’s most recent travel ban, dubbed “the Muslim ban.” A huge percentage of the American population is opposed to the ban due to its discriminatory nature; however, supporters of the ban believe that it is necessary to preserve national security. In order to understand the nature of the current political climate and decide the best course of action, it is imperative to gather empirical evidence by looking back into American political history. This study examined the relationship between fears propagated within a society and how it directly affects the formulation of certain discriminatory legislation. Using historical records from the early 1900’s, the study analyzed the 1913 Alien Land Act in California (ALAC), which barred people of ethnic minorities from owning land in the State. The research revealed a similarity between the ALAC and “the Muslim ban,” which were both enacted to target a specific minority group. The paper demonstrated America’s longstanding fear of foreigners and immigrants; using the repeal of the Alien Land Act, it proves that those fears are most often unjustifiable. In addition, it also illustrates the moral, social, and political implications of stigmatizing a select minority.