Presentation Title

THE COWPEA APHID SALIVA CONTAINS PROTEINS ORIGINATING FROM THE APHID AND APHID ENDOSYMBIOTIC BACTERIA

Faculty Mentor

Isgouhi Kaloshian

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 57

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Cowpea, (Vigna unguiculata) a legume, is a vital source of nutrition for millions of people inhabiting Sub Sahara Africa, because of its ability to thrive in drought ridden regions, and produce proteins essential to a nutritious diet. Even with drought resistant features, the major limitation of cowpea production is an overbearing infestation by insects. The cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora, is a major pest that develops a problematic insect-host relationship with cowpea. Symptoms of infestation include chlorosis, stunted growth, and ultimately necrosis, which destroy the plant. During feeding, cowpea aphids insert their flexible hypodermal needle-like mouthpart, known as stylets, into the plant tissues to ingest the phloem sap. In this process, aphids secrete saliva to facilitate feeding and modulate the plant’s metabolism and defense responses. To characterize cowpea aphid salivary proteins, saliva was collected in an in vitro system from a large number of aphids. Saliva was concentrated and subjected to ultra-performance liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) with an Orbitrap Fusion to identify the protein composition. Spectra obtained from MS/MS were searched against both NCBI “Aphididae” and a custom database composed of multiple aphid species proteomes, six frame translated transcriptomes, and proteomes of aphid associated microbial symbionts. Various bioinformatics tools were used to annotate the identified proteins and comparative analysis were performed with salivary proteins previously identified from other aphid species. Our results indicate the presence of aphid species-specific proteins and proteins that originate from symbiotic bacteria within the cowpea aphid. By characterizing the identified salivary proteins and plant-insect interactions at a molecular level, we can better understand how this aphid pest is able to parasitize its plant host and ultimately develop strategies to reduce cowpea aphid infestation.

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

THE COWPEA APHID SALIVA CONTAINS PROTEINS ORIGINATING FROM THE APHID AND APHID ENDOSYMBIOTIC BACTERIA

BSC-Ursa Minor 57

Cowpea, (Vigna unguiculata) a legume, is a vital source of nutrition for millions of people inhabiting Sub Sahara Africa, because of its ability to thrive in drought ridden regions, and produce proteins essential to a nutritious diet. Even with drought resistant features, the major limitation of cowpea production is an overbearing infestation by insects. The cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora, is a major pest that develops a problematic insect-host relationship with cowpea. Symptoms of infestation include chlorosis, stunted growth, and ultimately necrosis, which destroy the plant. During feeding, cowpea aphids insert their flexible hypodermal needle-like mouthpart, known as stylets, into the plant tissues to ingest the phloem sap. In this process, aphids secrete saliva to facilitate feeding and modulate the plant’s metabolism and defense responses. To characterize cowpea aphid salivary proteins, saliva was collected in an in vitro system from a large number of aphids. Saliva was concentrated and subjected to ultra-performance liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) with an Orbitrap Fusion to identify the protein composition. Spectra obtained from MS/MS were searched against both NCBI “Aphididae” and a custom database composed of multiple aphid species proteomes, six frame translated transcriptomes, and proteomes of aphid associated microbial symbionts. Various bioinformatics tools were used to annotate the identified proteins and comparative analysis were performed with salivary proteins previously identified from other aphid species. Our results indicate the presence of aphid species-specific proteins and proteins that originate from symbiotic bacteria within the cowpea aphid. By characterizing the identified salivary proteins and plant-insect interactions at a molecular level, we can better understand how this aphid pest is able to parasitize its plant host and ultimately develop strategies to reduce cowpea aphid infestation.