Presentation Title

The effect of physical stress signals on conspecific interactions in green-and-black poison frogs (Dendrobates auratus)

Faculty Mentor

Lee B. Kats

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 42

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Amphibian declines have been a major focus of the scientific community for nearly three decades. Many studies describe the leading causes of amphibian decline related to disease, with chytridiomycosis as the most notable example. However, little is known about behavioral conspecific interactions among ill or stressed amphibians, particularly neotropical species. Previous observational research on poison frogs determined that stressed Dendrobates auratus flip onto their backs in a reaction that is similar to fainting in other species. In this study, we examine conspecific interactions of green-and-black poison frogs (D. auratus) with “healthy” and “sick” model frogs, in order to determine a difference in interaction time between an upright healthy D. auratus model and an inverted sick D. auratus model. D. auratus frogs spent an average of 61.7% of the trial time interacting with an upright model frog, compared to an average of 43.8% of the trial time interacting with an inverted model frog. These data suggest that D. auratus frogs are able to recognize physical conspecific cues that signal illness and consequently choose to spend less time interacting with potentially ill individuals.

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

The effect of physical stress signals on conspecific interactions in green-and-black poison frogs (Dendrobates auratus)

BSC-Ursa Minor 42

Amphibian declines have been a major focus of the scientific community for nearly three decades. Many studies describe the leading causes of amphibian decline related to disease, with chytridiomycosis as the most notable example. However, little is known about behavioral conspecific interactions among ill or stressed amphibians, particularly neotropical species. Previous observational research on poison frogs determined that stressed Dendrobates auratus flip onto their backs in a reaction that is similar to fainting in other species. In this study, we examine conspecific interactions of green-and-black poison frogs (D. auratus) with “healthy” and “sick” model frogs, in order to determine a difference in interaction time between an upright healthy D. auratus model and an inverted sick D. auratus model. D. auratus frogs spent an average of 61.7% of the trial time interacting with an upright model frog, compared to an average of 43.8% of the trial time interacting with an inverted model frog. These data suggest that D. auratus frogs are able to recognize physical conspecific cues that signal illness and consequently choose to spend less time interacting with potentially ill individuals.