Presentation Title

The Effect of Seasonal Dimorphism in Leaf Traits in Coastal Sage Scrub

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Cheryl Swift

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 45

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Black sage (Salvia mellifera), purple sage (Salvia leucophylla), and white sage (Salvia apiana) are relatively small shrubs that grow primarily in the coastal sage scrub, low chaparral, and desert scrub plant communities of California and Baja California. These species co-occur, and each species employs slightly different strategies to cope with summer drought typical of a Mediterranean ecosystem. Both S. mellifera and S. leucophylla produce brachyblasts which are short shoots growing from leaf axils along the main stem that typically produce smaller leaves during the warm season. Dolichoblasts are the main stems of the plant that typically produce larger leaves in the wetter winter and spring months. Although the leaves of brachyblasts and dolichoblasts differ in size, studies have shown they roughly maintain the same thickness. Both of these species flower in the early spring. Salvia apiana does not produce dimorphic leaves, and flowers in the late spring. In this study, we compare leaf traits and stomatal conductance, photosynthetic rates, and water potentials of these three species. We took diurnal stomatal conductance and water potential measurements of the sage species in both a restored and native area. We also compared stomatal conductance between seasonal leaves for each species and photosynthetic rates between species. Differences in these traits for these different species may reveal differences in strategies that enable these closely related species to co-exist.

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

The Effect of Seasonal Dimorphism in Leaf Traits in Coastal Sage Scrub

BSC-Ursa Minor 45

Black sage (Salvia mellifera), purple sage (Salvia leucophylla), and white sage (Salvia apiana) are relatively small shrubs that grow primarily in the coastal sage scrub, low chaparral, and desert scrub plant communities of California and Baja California. These species co-occur, and each species employs slightly different strategies to cope with summer drought typical of a Mediterranean ecosystem. Both S. mellifera and S. leucophylla produce brachyblasts which are short shoots growing from leaf axils along the main stem that typically produce smaller leaves during the warm season. Dolichoblasts are the main stems of the plant that typically produce larger leaves in the wetter winter and spring months. Although the leaves of brachyblasts and dolichoblasts differ in size, studies have shown they roughly maintain the same thickness. Both of these species flower in the early spring. Salvia apiana does not produce dimorphic leaves, and flowers in the late spring. In this study, we compare leaf traits and stomatal conductance, photosynthetic rates, and water potentials of these three species. We took diurnal stomatal conductance and water potential measurements of the sage species in both a restored and native area. We also compared stomatal conductance between seasonal leaves for each species and photosynthetic rates between species. Differences in these traits for these different species may reveal differences in strategies that enable these closely related species to co-exist.