Presentation Title

The Effects of Police Violence in Media on Mood and Perceived Police Effectiveness

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Kimmy Kee-Rose

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 10

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Electronic media have become a widely accessed source of information and play an important role in shaping attitudes and perceptions of everyday life; however, it is not uncommon for media to draw attention toward extreme outcomes such as violence and deaths. Previous studies have shown that viewing police violence through various media platforms had an effect on attitudes toward the police. This study examined whether exposure to clips/videos of police brutality would affect mood and satisfaction with procedural justice and police legitimacy in 100 university students. Participants were randomly assigned to a control (n=50) or experimental group (n=50). Baseline mood was measured using the Positive and Negative Affective Schedule Scale. Then participants were asked to watch a series of videos, showing either normal police protocol (control condition) or police misconduct involving physical or verbal aggression (experimental condition). Their mood was then assessed again. Perceived effectiveness of police performance was also assessed using the Police Legitimacy Measure. A series of paired-samples t-tests revealed that the experimental sample experienced significantly less positive affect (t(49)= -4.09, p=.0001, Cohen’s d=0.60) and more negative affect (t(49)=13.63, p=.0001, Cohen’s d=1.95) after viewing police violence. However, for the control group, differences between baseline and retest scores for positive affect (t(49) = 1.43, p=n.s., Cohen’s d=0.16) and negative affect (t(49)=0.72, p=n.s., Cohen’s d=0.10) were not statistically significant. Lastly, an independent-samples t-test revealed that scores of perceived police effectiveness or legitimacy were significantly lower for the experimental group, t(98)=2.29, p=.024, Cohen’s d=0.46. Overall, these findings may expand our understanding of exposure to videos of police brutality on our mood and perception of police effectiveness.

Summary of research results to be presented

A series of paired-samples t-tests revealed that the experimental sample experienced significantly less positive affect (t(49)= -4.09, p=.0001, Cohen’s d=0.60) and more negative affect (t(49)=13.63, p=.0001, Cohen’s d=1.95) after viewing police violence. However, for the control group, differences between baseline and retest scores for positive affect (t(49) = 1.43, p=n.s., Cohen’s d=0.16) and negative affect (t(49)=0.72, p=n.s., Cohen’s d=0.10) were not statistically significant. Lastly, an independent-samples t-test revealed that scores of perceived police effectiveness or legitimacy were significantly lower for the experimental group, t(98)=2.29, p=.024, Cohen’s d=0.46.

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

The Effects of Police Violence in Media on Mood and Perceived Police Effectiveness

BSC-Ursa Minor 10

Electronic media have become a widely accessed source of information and play an important role in shaping attitudes and perceptions of everyday life; however, it is not uncommon for media to draw attention toward extreme outcomes such as violence and deaths. Previous studies have shown that viewing police violence through various media platforms had an effect on attitudes toward the police. This study examined whether exposure to clips/videos of police brutality would affect mood and satisfaction with procedural justice and police legitimacy in 100 university students. Participants were randomly assigned to a control (n=50) or experimental group (n=50). Baseline mood was measured using the Positive and Negative Affective Schedule Scale. Then participants were asked to watch a series of videos, showing either normal police protocol (control condition) or police misconduct involving physical or verbal aggression (experimental condition). Their mood was then assessed again. Perceived effectiveness of police performance was also assessed using the Police Legitimacy Measure. A series of paired-samples t-tests revealed that the experimental sample experienced significantly less positive affect (t(49)= -4.09, p=.0001, Cohen’s d=0.60) and more negative affect (t(49)=13.63, p=.0001, Cohen’s d=1.95) after viewing police violence. However, for the control group, differences between baseline and retest scores for positive affect (t(49) = 1.43, p=n.s., Cohen’s d=0.16) and negative affect (t(49)=0.72, p=n.s., Cohen’s d=0.10) were not statistically significant. Lastly, an independent-samples t-test revealed that scores of perceived police effectiveness or legitimacy were significantly lower for the experimental group, t(98)=2.29, p=.024, Cohen’s d=0.46. Overall, these findings may expand our understanding of exposure to videos of police brutality on our mood and perception of police effectiveness.