Presentation Title

The End Is Nigh: A dissection of the correlation between fear of god and fear of climate change

Presenter Information

Roanan KeldinFollow

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Ann Gordon

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 7

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

The environment is in turmoil. The actions the U.S. have taken in climate change negotiations are motivated by public fear. It is necessary to dissect the public perspective on climate change to understand what exactly causes people to be aware of this prominent issue. One of the primary factors that shapes this perspective is religious affiliation. There exists a negative relationship between fear of religion and fear of climate change. Those that have a strong, consistent faith (fear of a god) tend to have a weaker fear of climate change compared to those that do not have a religious affiliation (do not fear a god). I will explore the underlying reasoning behind this correlation and the factors that motivate religious people to be less afraid of climate change. I will additionally dissect the negative effects of looking at such topical issues with a religious lens. As each day passes, the need to raise public awareness on environmental issues heightens. The only way to save the planet and make our earth a sustainable place to live is to identify why some are more afraid of climate change than others. The data provided by the Chapman University National Survey of Fears, indicates a positive correlation between fear of religion and fear of climate change.

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

The End Is Nigh: A dissection of the correlation between fear of god and fear of climate change

BSC-Ursa Minor 7

The environment is in turmoil. The actions the U.S. have taken in climate change negotiations are motivated by public fear. It is necessary to dissect the public perspective on climate change to understand what exactly causes people to be aware of this prominent issue. One of the primary factors that shapes this perspective is religious affiliation. There exists a negative relationship between fear of religion and fear of climate change. Those that have a strong, consistent faith (fear of a god) tend to have a weaker fear of climate change compared to those that do not have a religious affiliation (do not fear a god). I will explore the underlying reasoning behind this correlation and the factors that motivate religious people to be less afraid of climate change. I will additionally dissect the negative effects of looking at such topical issues with a religious lens. As each day passes, the need to raise public awareness on environmental issues heightens. The only way to save the planet and make our earth a sustainable place to live is to identify why some are more afraid of climate change than others. The data provided by the Chapman University National Survey of Fears, indicates a positive correlation between fear of religion and fear of climate change.