Presentation Title

The Gender Gap in Preference for Government Size

Faculty Mentor

Ann Gordon

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 30

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

The issue of government size plays a crucial role in determining how the United States government functions and how involved it is in the lives of its citizens. There seems to be a significant divide between those who maintain that the current government is large because of big issues or simply because it has overstepped its boundaries. Looking at gender, I aim to distinguish how that affects public opinion about small versus large government. Previous research has shown the correlations between opinion of size of government and gender. This research, however, fails to include the ways in which other factors within gender influence these people’s views. This study examines data from the 2012 and 2016 ANES Time Series in order to fully comprehend why women and men differ in favoring small or large sizes of government. Through my own research, I determined that it is party identification, not gender, that plays the largest role in exerting the most influence in opinions regarding government size. Not only does party identification continue to have the largest impact, the gender gap seems to be widening compared to previous research on this issue. It is important to conduct further research in order to fully comprehend what this discovery entails and how it is different from past research.

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

The Gender Gap in Preference for Government Size

BSC-Ursa Minor 30

The issue of government size plays a crucial role in determining how the United States government functions and how involved it is in the lives of its citizens. There seems to be a significant divide between those who maintain that the current government is large because of big issues or simply because it has overstepped its boundaries. Looking at gender, I aim to distinguish how that affects public opinion about small versus large government. Previous research has shown the correlations between opinion of size of government and gender. This research, however, fails to include the ways in which other factors within gender influence these people’s views. This study examines data from the 2012 and 2016 ANES Time Series in order to fully comprehend why women and men differ in favoring small or large sizes of government. Through my own research, I determined that it is party identification, not gender, that plays the largest role in exerting the most influence in opinions regarding government size. Not only does party identification continue to have the largest impact, the gender gap seems to be widening compared to previous research on this issue. It is important to conduct further research in order to fully comprehend what this discovery entails and how it is different from past research.