Presentation Title

The Use of Atomic Force Microscopy to Detect IAPP Fibers from Diabetic and Nondiabetic Organisms

Faculty Mentor

David Moffet

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 66

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

25.8 million children and adults in the United States are diagnosed with Type II diabetes with nearly 2 million new cases each year. As the disease progresses, patients lose pancreatic β cells (the cells that produce insulin) with up to a 45% loss of pancreatic mass. The cause of the disease, however, remains unknown. It is believed that islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is one of the agents responsible for the death of β cells. IAPP accumulates in the pancreas, where it aggregates into a variety of toxic forms that are known to kill β cells. In this study, we used Atomic Force Microscopy to detect amyloid fibers from the IAPP proteins of different organisms. Some of these organisms are known to develop type 2 diabetes while others are known to not develop the disease. By comparing IAPP amyloidogenicty with an organism’s propensity to develop type 2 diabetes, we hope to establish a direct causality between IAPP aggregation and type 2 diabetes within the animal kingdom.

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

The Use of Atomic Force Microscopy to Detect IAPP Fibers from Diabetic and Nondiabetic Organisms

BSC-Ursa Minor 66

25.8 million children and adults in the United States are diagnosed with Type II diabetes with nearly 2 million new cases each year. As the disease progresses, patients lose pancreatic β cells (the cells that produce insulin) with up to a 45% loss of pancreatic mass. The cause of the disease, however, remains unknown. It is believed that islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is one of the agents responsible for the death of β cells. IAPP accumulates in the pancreas, where it aggregates into a variety of toxic forms that are known to kill β cells. In this study, we used Atomic Force Microscopy to detect amyloid fibers from the IAPP proteins of different organisms. Some of these organisms are known to develop type 2 diabetes while others are known to not develop the disease. By comparing IAPP amyloidogenicty with an organism’s propensity to develop type 2 diabetes, we hope to establish a direct causality between IAPP aggregation and type 2 diabetes within the animal kingdom.