Presentation Title

UV-curable PDMS for Additive Manufacturing of Microfluidic Devices

Faculty Mentor

Roger C. Lo

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 93

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

Microfluidics involves the study of fluid behaviors, controlled fluid manipulations, and the design of systems that can reliably perform such tasks at the microscale (typically tens to hundreds of micrometers). For over two decades, microfluidics has found applications as an enabling platform to miniaturize chemical and biological processes in various areas, such as biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. Poly(dimethylsiloxane), PDMS, is a common material of choice for microfluidic devices due to its elasticity, high optical transparency and biocompatibility. Soft lithography is a common technique to fabricate PDMS microfluidic devices, but it requires master preparation followed by casting and curing in a cleanroom. Non-cleanroom based techniques have been demonstrated but they are still based on a molding process.

In this work, we seek to streamline the fabrication process by eliminating the molding step via formulating a UV-curable PDMS tailored for direct additive manufacturing. Advantages of this new approach facilitate rapid prototyping and significantly accelerate the development of microfluidic devices for desired applications.

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

UV-curable PDMS for Additive Manufacturing of Microfluidic Devices

BSC-Ursa Minor 93

Microfluidics involves the study of fluid behaviors, controlled fluid manipulations, and the design of systems that can reliably perform such tasks at the microscale (typically tens to hundreds of micrometers). For over two decades, microfluidics has found applications as an enabling platform to miniaturize chemical and biological processes in various areas, such as biology, chemistry, engineering, and medicine. Poly(dimethylsiloxane), PDMS, is a common material of choice for microfluidic devices due to its elasticity, high optical transparency and biocompatibility. Soft lithography is a common technique to fabricate PDMS microfluidic devices, but it requires master preparation followed by casting and curing in a cleanroom. Non-cleanroom based techniques have been demonstrated but they are still based on a molding process.

In this work, we seek to streamline the fabrication process by eliminating the molding step via formulating a UV-curable PDMS tailored for direct additive manufacturing. Advantages of this new approach facilitate rapid prototyping and significantly accelerate the development of microfluidic devices for desired applications.