Presentation Title

Valence of Curvature and Angularity: Influences in Decision-Making

Faculty Mentor

Jesse J. Bengson

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 25

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Previous studies have demonstrated preferences for curved/rounded objects compared with sharp/angled objects (Bar & Neta, 2006; Leder & Carbon, 2005; Leder et al, 2011). These findings have been implemented in the design of many of our car features, electronic devices, and home furnishings. Studies suggest that angled objects are less preferable because they represent potential threat compared with rounded objects (Bar & Neta, 2007; Leder et al, 2011). However, recent findings have demonstrated an attraction to curvature separate of angularity (Bertamini et al, 2015; Palumbo et al, 2015; Palumbo & Bertamini, 2016). The literature illustrates something fundamental about curvature that generates a positive response. The current design expands on previous work in decision-making. Using a variation of an attention paradigm (Bengson, Kelley, & Mangun, 2015; Posner, Snyder, & Davidson, 1980), we designed a task in which participants will choose whether to expect something happy or something sad. Forty-six participants were presented with a cue and instructed to make a decision at the moment the cue appeared. Each cue presented was either curved or its angular counterpart. The stimuli were created by Bar & Neta (2006) for an original study on curvature preference. Based on previous evidence of valence association, we hypothesized that participants would choose something happy more frequently when presented with a curved shape and something sad more often when presented with an angular shape.

Keywords: decision-making, aesthetics, curvature preference, emotion, vision, visual perception

Summary of research results to be presented

Results are pending analysis, we currently have data from 46 participants and will have results ready by the time of the poster presentation.

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

Valence of Curvature and Angularity: Influences in Decision-Making

BSC-Ursa Minor 25

Previous studies have demonstrated preferences for curved/rounded objects compared with sharp/angled objects (Bar & Neta, 2006; Leder & Carbon, 2005; Leder et al, 2011). These findings have been implemented in the design of many of our car features, electronic devices, and home furnishings. Studies suggest that angled objects are less preferable because they represent potential threat compared with rounded objects (Bar & Neta, 2007; Leder et al, 2011). However, recent findings have demonstrated an attraction to curvature separate of angularity (Bertamini et al, 2015; Palumbo et al, 2015; Palumbo & Bertamini, 2016). The literature illustrates something fundamental about curvature that generates a positive response. The current design expands on previous work in decision-making. Using a variation of an attention paradigm (Bengson, Kelley, & Mangun, 2015; Posner, Snyder, & Davidson, 1980), we designed a task in which participants will choose whether to expect something happy or something sad. Forty-six participants were presented with a cue and instructed to make a decision at the moment the cue appeared. Each cue presented was either curved or its angular counterpart. The stimuli were created by Bar & Neta (2006) for an original study on curvature preference. Based on previous evidence of valence association, we hypothesized that participants would choose something happy more frequently when presented with a curved shape and something sad more often when presented with an angular shape.

Keywords: decision-making, aesthetics, curvature preference, emotion, vision, visual perception