Presentation Title

Disparities in Health Care Access Among Foreign-Born Latinos in California and Peruvian Indigenous

Faculty Mentor

Lia Roberts

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 34

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Minority status is often one of the key factors driving medical mistrust and reduced engagement with the healthcare system. This study compares differences in access, availability, and effectiveness of health care services brought on by ethnicity, social pressures and norms, trust and language in the Cusco province of Peru and Boyle Heights and East Los Angeles, California. Health care choices are determined by socioeconomic variables, but access variables such as distance to providers, mode of transportation, wait time and availability of providers play a role as well. A quantitative analysis of 45 face to face interviews from the summer of 2017 in Cusco, Peru is compared to a secondary analysis of household interviews collected by Alcala et al (2016) in Boyle Heights and East Los Angeles. Compared to Cusco, foreign born Latinos in Los Angeles face stronger barriers to health care access due to lack of insurance, cost, and availability, while social norms and distance to doctors better explain Indigenous Peruvian healthcare decisions. The factors that affected access to care in both groups is medical mistrust. This research concludes that, despite country level differences, health system connectedness and trust, rather than immigration status, drives access barriers for both the foreign- born Latino groups in East LA and Boyle Heights and indigenous Peruvians.

Keywords: Healthcare Policy, Latin America, Immigration, Trust, Indigenous, California, Peru, Barriers, Minority

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

Disparities in Health Care Access Among Foreign-Born Latinos in California and Peruvian Indigenous

BSC-Ursa Minor 34

Minority status is often one of the key factors driving medical mistrust and reduced engagement with the healthcare system. This study compares differences in access, availability, and effectiveness of health care services brought on by ethnicity, social pressures and norms, trust and language in the Cusco province of Peru and Boyle Heights and East Los Angeles, California. Health care choices are determined by socioeconomic variables, but access variables such as distance to providers, mode of transportation, wait time and availability of providers play a role as well. A quantitative analysis of 45 face to face interviews from the summer of 2017 in Cusco, Peru is compared to a secondary analysis of household interviews collected by Alcala et al (2016) in Boyle Heights and East Los Angeles. Compared to Cusco, foreign born Latinos in Los Angeles face stronger barriers to health care access due to lack of insurance, cost, and availability, while social norms and distance to doctors better explain Indigenous Peruvian healthcare decisions. The factors that affected access to care in both groups is medical mistrust. This research concludes that, despite country level differences, health system connectedness and trust, rather than immigration status, drives access barriers for both the foreign- born Latino groups in East LA and Boyle Heights and indigenous Peruvians.

Keywords: Healthcare Policy, Latin America, Immigration, Trust, Indigenous, California, Peru, Barriers, Minority