Presentation Title

Effect of Reclaimed Water on Properties of Mortar

Faculty Mentor

Monica Palomo, Rosa Vasconez

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 107

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

Concrete manufacturing is one of the industries with higher water demand. Potable water has traditionally been the source of concrete mixing water due to its easy availability. Finding alternative sources of mixing water for concrete production supports current water conservation efforts. This study investigated the use of reclaimed water as mixing water for the production of mortar and concrete. The effect on the properties of mortar such as compressive strength and setting times were evaluated. The water was collected from the California State Polytechnic University Pomona’s (CPP) reclaimed water pipe network. The reclaimed water collected was a blend of reclaimed water, provided from the City of Pomona Reclamation plant, and groundwater extracted in a local well. Potable water and reclaimed water were used as the two different treatments to evaluate mortar properties. Water analysis was conducted on the reclaimed water as well as the potable water to determine their physical and chemical properties. ASTM C109 specimens were prepared using either potable or reclaimed water with different water-to-cement ratios that ranged from .4-.485. Testing was conducted to investigate how different chemical composition of the reclaimed water would affect the compressive strength and setting time of the mortar. The water-to-cement ratio was varied with both water sources to compare their properties. Results indicated that the strength of the mortar using reclaimed was above 90% compared to the mean strength of the mortar using potable water specimens, while set times were within range according to ASTM C94. In conclusion, the reclaimed water was within the ASTM C1602M optional chemical standard limits for combined mixing water indicates that the reclaimed water can be used for mortar mixes and potentially for concrete and reinforced concrete mixtures.

Keywords: reclaimed water, mortar, potable water, groundwater

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

Effect of Reclaimed Water on Properties of Mortar

BSC-Ursa Minor 107

Concrete manufacturing is one of the industries with higher water demand. Potable water has traditionally been the source of concrete mixing water due to its easy availability. Finding alternative sources of mixing water for concrete production supports current water conservation efforts. This study investigated the use of reclaimed water as mixing water for the production of mortar and concrete. The effect on the properties of mortar such as compressive strength and setting times were evaluated. The water was collected from the California State Polytechnic University Pomona’s (CPP) reclaimed water pipe network. The reclaimed water collected was a blend of reclaimed water, provided from the City of Pomona Reclamation plant, and groundwater extracted in a local well. Potable water and reclaimed water were used as the two different treatments to evaluate mortar properties. Water analysis was conducted on the reclaimed water as well as the potable water to determine their physical and chemical properties. ASTM C109 specimens were prepared using either potable or reclaimed water with different water-to-cement ratios that ranged from .4-.485. Testing was conducted to investigate how different chemical composition of the reclaimed water would affect the compressive strength and setting time of the mortar. The water-to-cement ratio was varied with both water sources to compare their properties. Results indicated that the strength of the mortar using reclaimed was above 90% compared to the mean strength of the mortar using potable water specimens, while set times were within range according to ASTM C94. In conclusion, the reclaimed water was within the ASTM C1602M optional chemical standard limits for combined mixing water indicates that the reclaimed water can be used for mortar mixes and potentially for concrete and reinforced concrete mixtures.

Keywords: reclaimed water, mortar, potable water, groundwater