Presentation Title

Effect of resveratrol on Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens

Faculty Mentor

Stacey Peterson

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 47

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Bacteria have become increasingly difficult to fight over the years. For this reason our research focused on finding an alternative way to inhibit bacteria such as the use of natural products. The natural product used in this case was resveratrol. Resveratrol is an antioxidant produced by certain plants that protects them from pathogens. Previous research has shown that resveratrol has antimicrobial, antiviral, and antifungal properties. Therefore, the purpose of this experiment was to observe the effects of resveratrol on bacteria cultured individually and in co-culture. Specifically for our research we have focused on Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens to see how their growth would be affected by resveratrol. Our method consisted of incubating E. coli and S. marcescens individually and in co-culture with the addition of different concentrations of resveratrol. As controls we set up cultures without resveratrol and with the addition of just solvent (DMSO). We plated each culture after an overnight incubation to determine the number of cells. Our results showed that resveratrol inhibits the growth of both E. coli and S. marcescens individually in a dose-dependent manner. Previously we found S. marcescens to significantly inhibit E. coli when grown in co-culture. Interestingly, the addition of various concentrations of resveratrol protected E. coli from complete inhibition by S. marcescens. This was surprising considering resveratrol inhibited E. coli more efficiently than S. marcescens when grown individually. We believe resveratrol may be affecting quorum sensing in S. marcescens, weakening its ability to compete with E. coli. We are currently testing this hypothesis by looking at resveratrol’s effects on S. marcescens phenotypes controlled by quorum sensing including swarming motility, biofilm formation, and prodigiosin production.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

Effect of resveratrol on Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens

BSC-Ursa Minor 47

Bacteria have become increasingly difficult to fight over the years. For this reason our research focused on finding an alternative way to inhibit bacteria such as the use of natural products. The natural product used in this case was resveratrol. Resveratrol is an antioxidant produced by certain plants that protects them from pathogens. Previous research has shown that resveratrol has antimicrobial, antiviral, and antifungal properties. Therefore, the purpose of this experiment was to observe the effects of resveratrol on bacteria cultured individually and in co-culture. Specifically for our research we have focused on Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens to see how their growth would be affected by resveratrol. Our method consisted of incubating E. coli and S. marcescens individually and in co-culture with the addition of different concentrations of resveratrol. As controls we set up cultures without resveratrol and with the addition of just solvent (DMSO). We plated each culture after an overnight incubation to determine the number of cells. Our results showed that resveratrol inhibits the growth of both E. coli and S. marcescens individually in a dose-dependent manner. Previously we found S. marcescens to significantly inhibit E. coli when grown in co-culture. Interestingly, the addition of various concentrations of resveratrol protected E. coli from complete inhibition by S. marcescens. This was surprising considering resveratrol inhibited E. coli more efficiently than S. marcescens when grown individually. We believe resveratrol may be affecting quorum sensing in S. marcescens, weakening its ability to compete with E. coli. We are currently testing this hypothesis by looking at resveratrol’s effects on S. marcescens phenotypes controlled by quorum sensing including swarming motility, biofilm formation, and prodigiosin production.