Presentation Title

Effect of temperature on the metabolism of different populations of Tigriopus californicus, an intertidal copepod

Faculty Mentor

Casey A Mueller

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 51

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Tigriopus californicus is a harpacticoid copepod found in rocky intertidal pools along the Pacific coast of North America. The coastal environment that this species thrives in experiences extreme fluctuations in temperature on a seasonal, daily, and hourly scale, and these thermal changes likely require significant physiological adaptation for survival. T. californicus is an ideal organism to study thermal acclimatization and we sought to examine the time-specific metabolic responses of three populations of T. californicus when acclimated to different temperatures. The three populations of T. californicus, one from San Diego and two from different locations in Oregon, were shifted from 20 to 30°C at 2.5°C intervals every 48 h. Individual oxygen consumption rate was measured using a mini respirometry system and survival was recorded. Oxygen consumption rate did not show a clear significant trend between populations or temperatures, and survival of T. californicus had some decrease with higher temperature, but this was inconsistent. These results suggest T. californicus undertakes rapid acclimation to temperature changes. To examine the time course of acclimation, oxygen consumption rate was also measured at 0 to 6 h after a temperature increase from 20°C to 25°C. Oxygen consumption rates returned to levels measured at 20°C within 6 h in all three populations, confirming rapid acclimation. Overall, T. californicus is likely to display rapid changes in physiology in response to their variable environment, and it is possible that this species would be able to diverge and thrive in coastal environments that will be thermally altered by climate change.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

Effect of temperature on the metabolism of different populations of Tigriopus californicus, an intertidal copepod

BSC-Ursa Minor 51

Tigriopus californicus is a harpacticoid copepod found in rocky intertidal pools along the Pacific coast of North America. The coastal environment that this species thrives in experiences extreme fluctuations in temperature on a seasonal, daily, and hourly scale, and these thermal changes likely require significant physiological adaptation for survival. T. californicus is an ideal organism to study thermal acclimatization and we sought to examine the time-specific metabolic responses of three populations of T. californicus when acclimated to different temperatures. The three populations of T. californicus, one from San Diego and two from different locations in Oregon, were shifted from 20 to 30°C at 2.5°C intervals every 48 h. Individual oxygen consumption rate was measured using a mini respirometry system and survival was recorded. Oxygen consumption rate did not show a clear significant trend between populations or temperatures, and survival of T. californicus had some decrease with higher temperature, but this was inconsistent. These results suggest T. californicus undertakes rapid acclimation to temperature changes. To examine the time course of acclimation, oxygen consumption rate was also measured at 0 to 6 h after a temperature increase from 20°C to 25°C. Oxygen consumption rates returned to levels measured at 20°C within 6 h in all three populations, confirming rapid acclimation. Overall, T. californicus is likely to display rapid changes in physiology in response to their variable environment, and it is possible that this species would be able to diverge and thrive in coastal environments that will be thermally altered by climate change.