Presentation Title

Effects of Glutamate and its Antagonists on the feeding behavior of Lymnaea stagnalis and Helisoma trivolvis

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Kenneth Long

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 60

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

KEYWORDS: glutamate, chemoreception, freshwater snail, feeding behavior, antagonist

Studies of the gastropod nervous system have provided fundamental knowledge of neural interactions. Glutamate is a common neurotransmitter, and is one used in the central pattern generator that controls feeding behavior in gastropods. I tested the effects of L- and D-glutamate on the feeding behavior of the freshwater snails, Lymnaea stagnalis and Helisoma trivolvis. The glutamate receptor antagonist, CNQX, was studied to test its ability to block the behavioral effects of glutamate.

The frequency at which snails fed on agar pellets containing 20 mM maltose was used as an assay of feeding behavior. L- and D-glutamate (10-6 M to 10 -2 M) was added to artificial pond water (APW) in test chambers. Snails (n = 20 for each glutamate concentration) that had fasted for 24 hours were tested individually in chambers containing 200 mL APW for 60 minutes. At 5 min. intervals, snails were monitored and the number of individuals on a pellet was recorded. Feeding was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner; the lowest concentration of L- and D-glutamate that significantly inhibited feeding was 10-4 M in L. stagnalis and H. trivolvis.

To test whether the behavioral effect of glutamate was due to glutamate binding to one of its known receptors, snails were tested using equal concentrations of CNQX and L-glutamate (10-4 M). CNQX significantly blocked the inhibition of feeding in L. stagnalis. Tests using Helisoma will be completed.

The effect of glutamate on the behavior of freely moving snails mirrors its role as a neurotransmitter used in the central pattern generator that controls feeding.

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

Effects of Glutamate and its Antagonists on the feeding behavior of Lymnaea stagnalis and Helisoma trivolvis

BSC-Ursa Minor 60

KEYWORDS: glutamate, chemoreception, freshwater snail, feeding behavior, antagonist

Studies of the gastropod nervous system have provided fundamental knowledge of neural interactions. Glutamate is a common neurotransmitter, and is one used in the central pattern generator that controls feeding behavior in gastropods. I tested the effects of L- and D-glutamate on the feeding behavior of the freshwater snails, Lymnaea stagnalis and Helisoma trivolvis. The glutamate receptor antagonist, CNQX, was studied to test its ability to block the behavioral effects of glutamate.

The frequency at which snails fed on agar pellets containing 20 mM maltose was used as an assay of feeding behavior. L- and D-glutamate (10-6 M to 10 -2 M) was added to artificial pond water (APW) in test chambers. Snails (n = 20 for each glutamate concentration) that had fasted for 24 hours were tested individually in chambers containing 200 mL APW for 60 minutes. At 5 min. intervals, snails were monitored and the number of individuals on a pellet was recorded. Feeding was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner; the lowest concentration of L- and D-glutamate that significantly inhibited feeding was 10-4 M in L. stagnalis and H. trivolvis.

To test whether the behavioral effect of glutamate was due to glutamate binding to one of its known receptors, snails were tested using equal concentrations of CNQX and L-glutamate (10-4 M). CNQX significantly blocked the inhibition of feeding in L. stagnalis. Tests using Helisoma will be completed.

The effect of glutamate on the behavior of freely moving snails mirrors its role as a neurotransmitter used in the central pattern generator that controls feeding.