Presentation Title

Effects of relaxed selection on experimentally evolved populations of Drosophila melanogaster

Faculty Mentor

Parvin Shahrestani

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 9

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

With global climate change, some populations of animals will experience selection pressures for becoming tolerant of new dry and arid environments. In Drosophila melanogaster, the laboratory fruit fly, five populations were experimentally evolved for such desiccation resistance over 200 generations of laboratory natural selection. After desiccation resistance evolved, these populations were maintained under relaxed selection for 200 generations. We compared these formerly desiccation resistant populations to their controls for physiological and genomic differentiation. We found that almost all physiological traits that had become differentiated during forward selection have now reverted. But the formerly desiccation resistant populations still differ from their control populations for longevity, as well as at twelve genetic sites. We are currently examining these sites of differentiation. Studies of reverse evolution, such as ours, can help our understanding of how short term adaptation happens and to what extent evolution can be reversed.

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

Effects of relaxed selection on experimentally evolved populations of Drosophila melanogaster

BSC-Ursa Minor 9

With global climate change, some populations of animals will experience selection pressures for becoming tolerant of new dry and arid environments. In Drosophila melanogaster, the laboratory fruit fly, five populations were experimentally evolved for such desiccation resistance over 200 generations of laboratory natural selection. After desiccation resistance evolved, these populations were maintained under relaxed selection for 200 generations. We compared these formerly desiccation resistant populations to their controls for physiological and genomic differentiation. We found that almost all physiological traits that had become differentiated during forward selection have now reverted. But the formerly desiccation resistant populations still differ from their control populations for longevity, as well as at twelve genetic sites. We are currently examining these sites of differentiation. Studies of reverse evolution, such as ours, can help our understanding of how short term adaptation happens and to what extent evolution can be reversed.