Presentation Title

Effects of the allelopathic compound juglone on the germination and seedling success of Eriogonum fasciculatum, Frangula californica, Rhamnus ilicifolia, Salsola tragus, and Salvia mellifera

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Edward Bobich

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 54

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

biological_agricultural_sciences

Abstract

Walnuts and other members of the Juglandaceae (walnut family) produce the allelopathic chemical juglone, which inhibits seed germination and growth of adult plants of certain species. The allelopathic effects of juglone on seed germination of native and non-native California plant species is being studied to determine which species can live in close proximity to the California endemic tree Juglans californica (Southern California black walnut) for restoration and landscaping. It was believed that seed germination for the native evergreen shrubs Eriogonum fasciculatum, Frangula californica, Rhamnus ilicifolia, and Salvia mellifera should be resistant to juglone because the species occur in close proximity to walnuts, although only R. ilicifolia typically occurs near the canopies of walnut trees. It was also hypothesized that S. tragus should not germinate well in the presence of juglone because it is nonnative and rarely found underneath the canopy of the trees. To this point, the conditions for optimal seed germination, defined as protrusion of the radicle, for seeds of E. fasciculatum (smoke), S. tragus (no treatment necessary), and S. mellifera (cold and smoke paper) have been determined. Only seeds of E. fasciculatum and S. mellifera were treated with varying juglone concentrations. In general, as the juglone concentration to which the seeds were exposed increased, percent seed germination decreased for both species, which may explain why these two species do not live close to the canopies of J. californica, like R. ilicifolia.

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

Effects of the allelopathic compound juglone on the germination and seedling success of Eriogonum fasciculatum, Frangula californica, Rhamnus ilicifolia, Salsola tragus, and Salvia mellifera

BSC-Ursa Minor 54

Walnuts and other members of the Juglandaceae (walnut family) produce the allelopathic chemical juglone, which inhibits seed germination and growth of adult plants of certain species. The allelopathic effects of juglone on seed germination of native and non-native California plant species is being studied to determine which species can live in close proximity to the California endemic tree Juglans californica (Southern California black walnut) for restoration and landscaping. It was believed that seed germination for the native evergreen shrubs Eriogonum fasciculatum, Frangula californica, Rhamnus ilicifolia, and Salvia mellifera should be resistant to juglone because the species occur in close proximity to walnuts, although only R. ilicifolia typically occurs near the canopies of walnut trees. It was also hypothesized that S. tragus should not germinate well in the presence of juglone because it is nonnative and rarely found underneath the canopy of the trees. To this point, the conditions for optimal seed germination, defined as protrusion of the radicle, for seeds of E. fasciculatum (smoke), S. tragus (no treatment necessary), and S. mellifera (cold and smoke paper) have been determined. Only seeds of E. fasciculatum and S. mellifera were treated with varying juglone concentrations. In general, as the juglone concentration to which the seeds were exposed increased, percent seed germination decreased for both species, which may explain why these two species do not live close to the canopies of J. californica, like R. ilicifolia.