Presentation Title

Healthcare Access among the Indigenous Communities in the US and Peru

Faculty Mentor

Luiza Nogaj,Sylvine Deprele, Lia Roberts

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 4

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

This comparative research project explores healthcare disparities in the Native American population in the United States and the indigenous population in Peru. Despite both country level and healthcare system variation, research shows that both populations experience similar barriers to access and, ultimately, similar health outcomes. In Peru about 28% of the population still live in rural communities, and many of these people simply live too far from providers or are uninsured. Twenty-three percent of Native Americans in the US live on tribal lands, and research shows that both populations suffer from a similar lack of access to providers. Spatial analysis and analysis of aggregate data from the Cusco province in Peru, the Mescalero Reservation, Taos Pueblo, Zia Reservation, the San Felipe Pueblo in New Mexico, and the Hopi Reservation in Arizona demonstrates barriers to healthcare access (specifically, distance to clinics and providers). Qualitative analysis of 45 face to face interviews collected in the Cusco province of Peru and paired with secondary analysis of aggregate data on access to providers and facilities to demonstrate the effect of socioeconomic and political factors on both obstacles to access and health outcomes. The lack of policies and funding to these communities also hinders the indigenous from receiving the care they need. This paper shows that the indigenous population in the United States and the indigenous population in Peru face similar healthcare access obstacles while controlling for institutional and policy variation.

Keywords: Native American, Indigenous, Peru, Healthcare, Disparities.

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

Healthcare Access among the Indigenous Communities in the US and Peru

BSC-Ursa Minor 4

This comparative research project explores healthcare disparities in the Native American population in the United States and the indigenous population in Peru. Despite both country level and healthcare system variation, research shows that both populations experience similar barriers to access and, ultimately, similar health outcomes. In Peru about 28% of the population still live in rural communities, and many of these people simply live too far from providers or are uninsured. Twenty-three percent of Native Americans in the US live on tribal lands, and research shows that both populations suffer from a similar lack of access to providers. Spatial analysis and analysis of aggregate data from the Cusco province in Peru, the Mescalero Reservation, Taos Pueblo, Zia Reservation, the San Felipe Pueblo in New Mexico, and the Hopi Reservation in Arizona demonstrates barriers to healthcare access (specifically, distance to clinics and providers). Qualitative analysis of 45 face to face interviews collected in the Cusco province of Peru and paired with secondary analysis of aggregate data on access to providers and facilities to demonstrate the effect of socioeconomic and political factors on both obstacles to access and health outcomes. The lack of policies and funding to these communities also hinders the indigenous from receiving the care they need. This paper shows that the indigenous population in the United States and the indigenous population in Peru face similar healthcare access obstacles while controlling for institutional and policy variation.

Keywords: Native American, Indigenous, Peru, Healthcare, Disparities.