Presentation Title

Insomnia Symptoms and Memory Prescription Medication Use among Clinically vs. Non-Clinically Depressed Cancer Survivors

Faculty Mentor

Selena Nguyen Rodriguez, PhD.

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 14

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

behavioral_social_sciences

Abstract

Approximately 20% of cancer survivors report moderate to high levels of depression. Cancer survivors are also shown to have symptoms of insomnia, with 51% of them reporting difficulties sleeping throughout their survivorship. A study of a nationally representative sample reported that 13% of those with a history of cancer suffered from memory problems. However, research exploring insomnia and memory related to depression among cancer survivors is limited. The current analyses assessed whether depression was related to insomnia symptoms and memory medication use among cancer survivors. Secondary, cross-sectional analysis of the 2014 national Health and Retirement Study (HRS) data were employed. The HRS data were collected via face-to-face or telephone interviews (in English or Spanish as appropriate). The sample (N=17,092) was 45.9% male, with a mean age of 66.96±0.24 years. Chi-square analyses using a complex samples design showed ever being diagnosed with depression was significantly associated with trouble falling asleep (χ2(1.87, 104.48)=92.64, p<.001), trouble waking up during night (χ2(1.88, 104.98)=49.05, p<.001) and waking up too early (χ2(1.67, 93.35)=52.53, p<.001). Depression was not related to use of memory prescription medication (χ2(1, 56)=.440, p=.551). Findings indicate aftercare for cancer survivors may need to incorporate strategies to support healthful sleep for the recovery process.

Word Count: 200

Summary of research results to be presented

The sample (N=17,092) was 45.9% male, with a mean age of 66.96±0.24 years. Chi-square analyses using a complex samples design showed ever being diagnosed with depression was significantly associated with trouble falling asleep, trouble waking up during night, and waking up too early. However, depression was not related to use of memory prescription medication, as our findings came out to be insignificant.

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

Insomnia Symptoms and Memory Prescription Medication Use among Clinically vs. Non-Clinically Depressed Cancer Survivors

BSC-Ursa Minor 14

Approximately 20% of cancer survivors report moderate to high levels of depression. Cancer survivors are also shown to have symptoms of insomnia, with 51% of them reporting difficulties sleeping throughout their survivorship. A study of a nationally representative sample reported that 13% of those with a history of cancer suffered from memory problems. However, research exploring insomnia and memory related to depression among cancer survivors is limited. The current analyses assessed whether depression was related to insomnia symptoms and memory medication use among cancer survivors. Secondary, cross-sectional analysis of the 2014 national Health and Retirement Study (HRS) data were employed. The HRS data were collected via face-to-face or telephone interviews (in English or Spanish as appropriate). The sample (N=17,092) was 45.9% male, with a mean age of 66.96±0.24 years. Chi-square analyses using a complex samples design showed ever being diagnosed with depression was significantly associated with trouble falling asleep (χ2(1.87, 104.48)=92.64, p<.001), trouble waking up during night (χ2(1.88, 104.98)=49.05, p<.001) and waking up too early (χ2(1.67, 93.35)=52.53, p<.001). Depression was not related to use of memory prescription medication (χ2(1, 56)=.440, p=.551). Findings indicate aftercare for cancer survivors may need to incorporate strategies to support healthful sleep for the recovery process.

Word Count: 200