Presentation Title

Investigation of Zeolite Based on High Performance Concrete in Low Temperature Curing

Faculty Mentor

Pratanu Ghosh

Start Date

18-11-2017 12:30 PM

End Date

18-11-2017 1:30 PM

Location

BSC-Ursa Minor 95

Session

Poster 2

Type of Presentation

Poster

Subject Area

engineering_computer_science

Abstract

Concrete is a product that is utilized in everyday construction and included in designs for modern structures. Researchers are finding that concrete’s strength can be manually increased by making certain adjustments to its mix design, such as adding plasticizers or admixtures. The various properties that influence concrete’s compression and tensile strength are all dependent on the characteristics of the mix design, along with the effects of environmental conditions.

The research that is currently undergoing trials, consist of different binary and ternary high performance concrete mixtures. The mixtures are prepared by using cement, zeolite and other cementitious materials, such as fly ash, silica fume and slag. The volcanic rock Zeolite, is included in the mix design because case studies have shown that the use of natural zeolite improves the mechanical strength and durability properties of cement and concrete. Such combinations of cement additions may provide more benefits for concrete than a binary combination. Results typically show that a ternary mix design makes it possible to obtain higher strengths in comparison to binary mixtures. Since concrete encounters severe weather condition, some of its strength is sacrificed as air entrainer is utilized in the mix design to help prevent cracks. The mixing procedure is simulated in the lab and the batches are cured in a temperature tank set at 45 degrees Fahrenheit. The objective is to analyze how concrete’s strength reacts in cold temperature water and if it truly decreases in compression and tensile strength. Prior research trials consisted of concrete cylinders cured at a temperature of 100 degrees Fahrenheit, where certain batches resulted with over 6,000 psi in compressive strength. Results indicated hot weather curing increased strength, therefore strength is expected to decrease in cold weather.

In general, hot temperature curing increases compression because it expedites the hydration reaction of the concrete. Therefore; concrete will gain its rapid strength in a short period of time. In contrary to low temperature curing where the hydration reaction starts to slow down, but with the addition of 15 to 20% zeolite replacement the strength loss can be balanced. Although low temperature tends to oppose the hydration reaction, if the strength is compensated the hydration reaction will begin to improve. At the end, the strength loss will not be heavily impacted as the reduction of strength will be minimal and its durability will not be affected.

Since concrete is utilized all around the world, concrete encounters different climates that provoke certain behaviors which result in concrete’s strength and stability. By standard, tests are performed after a certain number of days to record the progress of concrete’s strength until it is finished curing. Tests are performed every seven, twenty-eight and fifty-six days after its pour day. Results will be compared with high and normal temperature to analyze how concrete’s compressive and tensile strengths are affected. The results will lead to more experiments to determine what factors or properties need to be adjusted to either prevent a decrease in strength or actually increase its strength.

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Nov 18th, 12:30 PM Nov 18th, 1:30 PM

Investigation of Zeolite Based on High Performance Concrete in Low Temperature Curing

BSC-Ursa Minor 95

Concrete is a product that is utilized in everyday construction and included in designs for modern structures. Researchers are finding that concrete’s strength can be manually increased by making certain adjustments to its mix design, such as adding plasticizers or admixtures. The various properties that influence concrete’s compression and tensile strength are all dependent on the characteristics of the mix design, along with the effects of environmental conditions.

The research that is currently undergoing trials, consist of different binary and ternary high performance concrete mixtures. The mixtures are prepared by using cement, zeolite and other cementitious materials, such as fly ash, silica fume and slag. The volcanic rock Zeolite, is included in the mix design because case studies have shown that the use of natural zeolite improves the mechanical strength and durability properties of cement and concrete. Such combinations of cement additions may provide more benefits for concrete than a binary combination. Results typically show that a ternary mix design makes it possible to obtain higher strengths in comparison to binary mixtures. Since concrete encounters severe weather condition, some of its strength is sacrificed as air entrainer is utilized in the mix design to help prevent cracks. The mixing procedure is simulated in the lab and the batches are cured in a temperature tank set at 45 degrees Fahrenheit. The objective is to analyze how concrete’s strength reacts in cold temperature water and if it truly decreases in compression and tensile strength. Prior research trials consisted of concrete cylinders cured at a temperature of 100 degrees Fahrenheit, where certain batches resulted with over 6,000 psi in compressive strength. Results indicated hot weather curing increased strength, therefore strength is expected to decrease in cold weather.

In general, hot temperature curing increases compression because it expedites the hydration reaction of the concrete. Therefore; concrete will gain its rapid strength in a short period of time. In contrary to low temperature curing where the hydration reaction starts to slow down, but with the addition of 15 to 20% zeolite replacement the strength loss can be balanced. Although low temperature tends to oppose the hydration reaction, if the strength is compensated the hydration reaction will begin to improve. At the end, the strength loss will not be heavily impacted as the reduction of strength will be minimal and its durability will not be affected.

Since concrete is utilized all around the world, concrete encounters different climates that provoke certain behaviors which result in concrete’s strength and stability. By standard, tests are performed after a certain number of days to record the progress of concrete’s strength until it is finished curing. Tests are performed every seven, twenty-eight and fifty-six days after its pour day. Results will be compared with high and normal temperature to analyze how concrete’s compressive and tensile strengths are affected. The results will lead to more experiments to determine what factors or properties need to be adjusted to either prevent a decrease in strength or actually increase its strength.